Stories for April 2014

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Wednesday, April 30

      

April 30, 2014- Community Briefs

Dinner, auction set by Montessori OKANOGAN – Children’s House Montessori School will host its spring dinner and auction at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Agriplex Annex at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds, 175 Rodeo Trail Road. Dinner will be catered by El Portal restaurant in Omak. A live auction will follow. Auction items include a barbecue basket with 20 pounds of hamburger from the Timm Ranch, Okanogan; a load of topsoil from Lees and Duke Excavating, Okanogan, and a ride on the Malott fire truck during Okanogan Days. The auction raises money for maintenance and budget items not covered by tuition. Admission will be charged. Tickets are available in advance from the school or parents, or at the door. Gardeners offer spring plant sale OMAK – A Washington State University Master Gardeners plant sale will be from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 10 in Civic League Park next to the library, 30 S. Ash St. The volunteer garden-advice group will offer annual and perennial flowers, vegetable starts, herbs, bulbs and grape starts. Master Gardeners also will offer answers to gardening questions. Tribal poster contest entries due NESPELEM — A children’s poster contest is under way, with entries due by 4 p.m. Friday. The theme is safety. The top poster in each category will be sent to the Northwest Indian Housing Association spring meeting to be entered into the regional contest. Entrants do not have to be Colville tribal members or tribal housing residents. Contest information is available from the housing authority, 509-634-2163. Shafer named MANSFIELD – Evalee Shafer has been crowned 2014 Little Miss Play Days. Shafer, a second-grader at Mansfield Elementary School, received the top honor after a pageant Saturday. She and the other nine candidates – including princesses Beau Nordby and Tiera Miller – all had to answer judges’ questions and perform a talent. The pageant was open to first- through fourth-graders. Nordby is a fourth-grader, and Miller is in second-grade. Play Days royalty represents the town in its annual celebration, set this year for June 13-14. Elders honored OMAK — A dinner for Colville tribal elders will be at noon Friday at the Omak Longhouse on Mission Road east of town. The menu includes roast beef, chicken, salads and other dishes. Door prizes will be offered. – The Chronicle

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Land trust offers fire education

The Okanogan Land Trust plans a series of educational events in early May concerning the role of wildfire and prescribed burns on the landscape.

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Nespelem rodeo kicks up dust

Caleb McMillan of Soap Lake edged Chase Nigg of Oroville for the senior boys all-around title at the 37th annual Nespelem Junior Rodeo last weekend, April 26-27.

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Brewster halts Cashmere’s win streak

In a showdown between the Caribou Trail League’s top teams, No. 8 state-ranked Brewster split with league-leading and No. 3 ranked Cashmere in a pair of pitcher’s duals Saturday.

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Run blossoms brightly

The idea of running among blooming fruit trees with snow-covered mountains in the distance came to fruition Saturday with the inaugural Omak Orchards in Bloom half marathon and 10K races.

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Tiger sets record

Shania Graham of Republic won the 1,600-meter run in a school record at a league meet April 22 in Colville.

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Lynn pens ballot statement

In a statement that will appear on the June 3 recall election ballot, Mayor Marilynn Lynn explained her side of the issue that led to the election, but makes no pleas to the residents.

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April 30, 2014- Marriage Licenses

From Okanogan County Auditor’s Office Maria Renee Brown, 24, and Kadance Dale Kuder, 24, both of Helena, Mont. Tamra Nicole Dias, 27, and Hank Louis Avena, 47, both of Brewster.

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Swine tagging canceled; photos wanted instead

Okanogan County Fair organizers are changing the pre-tagging and weighing rules for swine due to the outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea. Acting on a recommendation from the state veterinarian, the livestock committee said hogs to be shown and sold in the livestock sale will not be required to come to the fairgrounds for pre-tagging. Instead, the owner should take a clear, right-side view photograph of each pig to be entered. Photos must be emailed, mailed or hand-delivered to the fair office by 5 p.m. June 7. The exhibitor’s name, address and phone number, and the pig’s breed, gender and weight must be included, along with the date the photo was taken. An ear tag number will be assigned to each animal. A maximum of two pigs can be tagged per exhibitor, but only one can be entered in the market class. Any submissions received after June 7 will not be allowed to show or sell at the fair in the market class. Animals will be tagged upon arrival at the fair in September. Photos may be submitted to fair@co.okanogan.wa.us, mailed to Okanogan County Fair, P.O. Box 467, Okanogan 98840, or delivered to the fair office at 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan. Beef and sheep are required to attend a tagging and weighing event at the fairgrounds. The beef weigh-in was Saturday. Sheep can be weighed from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 31 or June 14 at the fairgrounds.

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Vintage Faire draws 2,500

Thousands of folks crowded into the Okanogan County Fairgrounds on Saturday to hunt for household and yard treasures, sample food and visit with other shoppers during the fourth annual Vintage Faire. “It’s a wonderful fair,” Washington Apple Labels vendor Marge Verbeck said. She and her husband Darrel Verbeck, both of Renton, were selling apple box labels from around the Northwest. His family has its roots in Okanogan County. “We had a lot of happy vendors and a lot of happy customers,” said Kris Little, one of the event’s three organizers. Others were Tria Skirko and Brooke Somes. Although the skies opened up and poured rain on Friday, by Saturday morning the sun was out. “We had good turnout and good weather,” Little said. “We’re all very happy.” Including vendors, she estimated attendance at 2,500. That’s up about 200 from last year. The faire featured a variety of vintage, repurposed, salvaged and classic items. Offerings included a flower-painted Volkswagen, vintage linens, kitchen kitsch, lighting fixtures made from old china, reupholstered furniture, bottle cap jewelry, log furniture, old toys and games, Mason jars, crocks, farm implements, a rusty truck door and more. The faire drew more than 50 vendors, also an increase from last year. While many shoppers examined vendors’ wares with a critical eye, others sat outside at picnic tables just watching others go by. Children frolicked on the new grass and straw strewn over previously muddy spots. Others sampled food, beverages and ice cream from a handful of food vendors, while some downed a few brews at the “Blue Ribbon Bar.” Okanogan High School wrestling team members were kept busy hauling purchases to shoppers’ vehicles. “They were running stuff out left and right,” Little said, adding that the wrestlers and another boy were kept busy all day. The Okanogan High School cheerleaders served as food vendor runners and had a face painting booth. People came from all over, including Canada, and left with cars, trucks and trailers loaded with treasures, Little said. The organizers plan to take a couple weeks off and then start planning next year’s event.

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Rogers named ‘Good Scout’ by Boy Scouts

Okanogan Valley District Boy Scouts named Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers the “Good Scout” for 2014. A couple dozen people gathered Saturday at the Okanogan Eagles Aerie for the “Good Scout” luncheon and fundraiser. “I love the Scouts. I’m a huge believer in the kids,” Rogers said of his award, adding that it really belongs with the Boy Scout volunteers. “My hat’s off to you, and thank you very much.” Longtime district executive and volunteer Gus Tillberg, who is retiring from active Scouting, and District Chairman Dave Yarnell, who received the Grand Columbia Council’s award of merit, were also recognized. Okanogan County Superior Court Judge Hank Rawson, a former district chairman, presented the award to Rogers, saying turnabout was fair play since Rogers had been the presenter years ago when Rawson won the Good Scout award. “He wears the uniform entrusted to him by the citizens of Okanogan County, but he is more than a law enforcement officer,” Rawson said. “He doesn’t just put on the uniform as a job and call it public service.” Rogers has been supportive of Scouting and also of a variety of community groups, Rawson said. Some of that involvement is because of his position as sheriff, but some is because he is a strong community member. By showing respect, participation, good citizenship and leadership, Rogers “exemplifies the Scouting purpose,” the judge said. “Frank exhibits that and lives that. He’s also a part of our community.” Rawson said he met Rogers years ago when Rawson was a defense attorney and Rogers worked for the Omak Police Department. Defendants ended up confessing to their crimes, saying Rogers “was the nicest officer,” Rawson said. “They’d just open up to him. Of course, that wasn’t good for their defense.” Rawson also acknowledged Rogers’ wife, Minette, for her support and activity in the community. “This means a lot,” Sheriff Rogers said after receiving the award. He said he and his wife believe in attending and supporting a variety of community events. Rawson also presented a recognition award to Tillberg, with whom he worked while Rawson served nine and a half years as district chairman. “He’s dedicated his life to Scouting,” he said of Tillberg, who began as a volunteer scoutmaster while stationed in Germany with the military. Council Executive Tim Johnson presented the merit award to Yarnell after noting the Okanogan Valley District saw a 7 percent net growth in the past year, even though Scouting nationwide “was down a little.” Yarnell said Okanogan Valley District Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts gave more than 3,000 hours of volunteer time to their communities last year. More than 300 families are served by Scouting in the Okanogan Valley District, which includes Okanogan and Ferry counties, he said. The guest speaker was Ferry County Commissioner and 7th District Sen. Brian Dansel, R-Republic, who said he appreciates Scouting as an organization that teaches self reliance and other skills. “You learn things in Scouting you don’t learn anywhere else,” he said. He said the values being taught in Scouting may turn out to be the things those young people will have to fight for someday. During the recent legislative session — his first as senator — Dansel said he could tell who among the visitors to his office had been Scouts by the way they con-ducted themselves. They were professional, employed and didn’t want money. Instead, they wanted not to be impeded by government. “With Scouting, you go out and experience things,” Johnson said. Color guard members for the luncheon were Ian Patrick and Dylan Streeter, both of Okanogan and Troop 60.

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April 30, 2014- Business Briefs

<strong>Farmers market to open</strong> OKANOGAN — The Okanogan Valley Farmers Market opens for the season Saturday morning. Market hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays in Legion Park on North Second Avenue. Opening day will feature live music, an espresso stand and a variety of plant starts, baked goods and crafts, spokesman Rick DeLap said. Some early greens also might be offered. Parking is available at the north end next to the Okanogan Fire Hall Museum, 1410 N. Second Ave., at the south next to the Okanogan Legion Hall, 860 N. Second Ave., and across the street at the Okanogan County Public Utility District headquarters, 1331 N. Second Ave. The Okanogan Valley Farmers Market site in Omak’s Civic League Park will open in June. The Methow Valley Farmers Market is open from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at the Methow Valley Community Center, 201 Methow St., Twisp. ----- <strong>Alliance surveys businesses</strong> OMAK — The Economic Alliance is surveying small businesses in Okanogan County. Along with basic information about business size, type and ownership, the survey asks questions about employee retention, access to financing, government permitting and regulations, shoplifting and theft, worker skills, wage and benefit costs, market change, business planning, advertising, interest in business seminars and other topics. During last Wednesday’s meeting, the group heard about business financing from Umpqua Bank’s Brewster Manager Coleen Couch and North Cascades Bank Okanogan Vice President and Loan Officer Jeff Brender. The alliance will give a June presentation to the county about the .09 infrastructure fund. The board’s next meeting, set for May 28, will include a presentation about Kinross Gold. ----- <strong>Chamber elects officers</strong> BRIDGEPORT – Officers have been elected to serve on the newly revived Bridgeport Area Chamber of Commerce. Mario Martinez is president, Hugo Martinez is vice-president, Marilynn Lynn is treasurer and Amparito Martinez is secretary. Scott Wright and Ron Lewis are at-large board members. As of last week, the chamber had about a dozen members, Lynn said. Glacier reports record income KALISPELL, Mont. – Glacier Bancorp, parent company of North Cascades Bank, has announced an all-time record net income of $26.7 million for the current quarter. That’s an increase of 29 percent from the prior year’s first quarter. North Cascades Bank has branches in Brewster, Grand Coulee, Okanogan, Omak and Twisp.

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Omak will keep vocational programs

The Omak School District does not have plans to change the agriculture and family and consumer education programs after the retirement of two longtime educators at the end of the school year.

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Three men have been charged with breaking into three cabins

Three men have been charged with breaking into three cabins. Jonathan G. Zigler, 22, of Aeneas Valley, and Barry J. Collins, 29, of Tonasket, were arrested April 7. The third suspect, Aaron D. Zigler, 24, also of Aeneas Valley, was arrested the next day. Jonathan Zigler and Collins both were charged April 10 with two counts each of residential burglary and second-degree malicious mischief, and one count each of first-degree burglary, second-degree burglary, first-degree theft, theft of a firearm, second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Aaron Zigler was charged April 11 with two counts each of residential burglary and second-degree malicious mischief, and one count each of first-degree burglary, second-degree burglary, first-degree theft, theft of a firearm, second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The suspects allegedly broke into the three cabins by kicking in the front doors, said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers. They allegedly ransacked the cabins and took more than $17,000 worth of items, including camping gear, tools, kitchen ware, a flat-screen television set, toiletries and food. They also allegedly broke into another small cabin in the area. One cabin had a game camera that allegedly captured images of three suspects doing the burglaries. Deputies Terry Shrable and Isaiah Holloway began to investigate possible suspects, Rogers said. The investigation led them to the Zigler residence at 1091 Aeneas Valley Road. They allegedly located several of the stolen items. After collecting “a large amount of evidence and stolen items,” the deputies arrested Jonathan Zigler and Collins, and took them to the county jail, Rogers said. The next day, the deputies located Aaron Zigler and arrested him.

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Three charged in cabin break-ins

Three men have been charged with breaking into three cabins. Jonathan G. Zigler, 22, of Aeneas Valley, and Barry J. Collins, 29, of Tonasket, were arrested April 7. The third suspect, Aaron D. Zigler, 24, also of Aeneas Valley, was arrested the next day. Jonathan Zigler and Collins both were charged April 10 with two counts each of residential burglary and second-degree malicious mischief, and one count each of first-degree burglary, second-degree burglary, first-degree theft, theft of a firearm, second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Aaron Zigler was charged April 11 with two counts each of residential burglary and second-degree malicious mischief, and one count each of first-degree burglary, second-degree burglary, first-degree theft, theft of a firearm, second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The suspects allegedly broke into the three cabins by kicking in the front doors, said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers. They allegedly ransacked the cabins and took more than $17,000 worth of items, including camping gear, tools, kitchen ware, a flat-screen television set, toiletries and food. They also allegedly broke into another small cabin in the area. One cabin had a game camera that allegedly captured images of three suspects doing the burglaries. Deputies Terry Shrable and Isaiah Holloway began to investigate possible suspects, Rogers said. The investigation led them to the Zigler residence at 1091 Aeneas Valley Road. They allegedly located several of the stolen items. After collecting “a large amount of evidence and stolen items,” the deputies arrested Jonathan Zigler and Collins, and took them to the county jail, Rogers said. The next day, the deputies located Aaron Zigler and arrested him.

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April 30, 2014- News Briefs

<strong>Police investigate unattended death</strong> OMAK — An unattended death at Shove House is being investigated by the Omak Police Department. The Omak Police Department is investigating the April 19 death of Tanya Hayner, 25, at the residential drug treatment facility. She “most likely” died of a drug overdose, Detective Rusty Tallant said. Clients of the facility, 1007 Koala Drive, apparently are free to come and go, he said, adding that the facility is not under investigation. Hayner apparently had left the facility within the 24 hours before her death, Tallant said. Skip Rosenthal, CEO of Okanogan Behavioral HealthCare, which oversees Shove House, could not be reached for comment. Hayner, the daughter of John and Laura Hayner of Okanogan, was a 2007 graduate of Okanogan High School. She was an orthopedic coordinator at Caribou Trail Orthopedics and a barista. A memorial service was Saturday at Dawson Gym in Okanogan. ----- <strong>Highway clearing remains on track</strong> MAZAMA – The state Department of Transportation is on track to re-open North Cascades Highway in mid-May, but spokesman Jeff Adamson said an exact date has yet to be pinpointed. About three to four inches of snow fell last Thursday, triggering some slides from avalanche chutes from Cutthroat to Washington Pass, Adamson said. More snow was forecast for Friday afternoon and throughout the night. By the end of last week, the highway on the east side of the pass was cleared through Liberty Bell avalanche chute No. 3, around milepost 163. The crew made some headway from there up through the Blue Lake Trailhead, 161.5. On the west side, the highway has been cleared up to milepost 156 near Rainy Pass, where snow is still about five feet deep, Adamson said. ----- <strong>Woman sentenced in dog rescue case</strong> OKANOGAN – A Carlton woman was sentenced to community service and must pay a fine for obstructing a law enforcement officer when she took a dog she believed to be mistreated in December. Judy Brezina Camp was ordered in Okanogan County Superior Court on April 11 to perform 100 hours of community service and pay a $768 fine. Camp was found not guilty in a jury trial last month of stealing a pet and making false or misleading statements to a public servant. Camp admitted to taking the dog, a 7-year-old blue heeler named Tank, on a cold December night from a junkyard near Twisp. She said his water bowl was frozen and didn’t think he had adequate shelter. The dog was owned by the Magruder family of Carlton, and the family pressed charges upon finding the dog was missing. She bought Tank from the family the day she was arrested. ----- <strong>Overturned crane snarls traffic</strong> BREWSTER – Traffic was restricted for about three hours last Thursday morning when a crane overturned on U.S. Highway 97 two miles north of town. The driver of the crane, owned by Gebbers Farms, was not injured, Washington State Patrol Trooper Darren Wright said. According to an incident report, the driver was over on the shoulder slightly at milepost 262 when the crane dipped into a soft spot. The driver overcorrected and the crane overturned, Wright said. The crash, reported shortly after 8:30 a.m., blocked the southbound lane. The highway was cleared by 11:25 a.m. ----- <strong>Hospital committee to meet today</strong> OKANOGAN – The first hospital committee meeting is scheduled for 3-5 p.m. today at the Grainger Administration Building, 123 N. Fifth Ave. The committee is comprised of officials from Mid-Valley Hospital in Omak, Three Rivers Hospital in Brewster and North Valley Hospital in Tonasket; as well as other area health care professionals and Okanogan County Commissioner Sheilah Kennedy. Agenda items include identifying objectives, setting meeting dates and gathering members’ contact information. Members have been asked to bring any studies that might exist concerning hospital consolidation.

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Social promotion caught up to us

For years, teacher competency has been a topic of contention in our state’s public schools. And for years, rather than focusing on the basics of education, our school curricula has slowly transitioned into a feel-good system where few failing students are held back.

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Constituents ask questions

Each month I receive thousands of emails, phone calls, letters, tweets and Facebook messages. Here are a few questions I have received recently: <strong>What is being done to hold former IRS official, Lois Lerner, and the Obama Administration accountable for their continued overreaching actions? </strong>When concerns were raised about IRS officials targeting conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status, several House Committees – including the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which I serve on – began investigating. Unfortunately, when Ms. Lerner testified in May 2013 and again in March, she refused to answer questions or shed light on the necessary information to evaluate the degree of wrongdoing by the IRS. Congress has a clear constitutional duty to conduct robust oversight of the executive branch and to ensure the laws are being faithfully executed. Given her ongoing refusal to cooperate, the Oversight and Government Reform Committee voted earlier this month to hold Ms. Lerner in contempt of Congress. The motion will now go before the full House of Representatives for approval. As the chairman of the Natural Resources Committee, I have overseen numerous investigations into the Obama Administration and can tell you firsthand that it is failing to live up to its promise of being the most open and transparent administration in history. What is Congress doing to get more Americans back to work? House Republicans’ focus remains on creating jobs and growing our economy. One common sense way to support small business job creators is to eliminate burdensome red tape and excessive government regulations that stifle job creation and make our economy less competitive. The House passed several bills to halt some of the Obama Administration’s most damaging regulations and ensure Congress gets final say on new rules that will have a major impact on the economy. In addition, the House has passed a number of bipartisan measures to create jobs and unlock America’s energy potential – including approving the Keystone pipeline, which is shovel-ready and has the potential to create tens of thousands of jobs. Finally, the House is working to eliminate barriers to trade by creating new opportunities for our growers and manufacturers to compete in a global marketplace, and we are working to fix the tax code to improve competitiveness. Rep. Doc Hastings represents Washington’s 4th Congressional District, including part of Okanogan County.

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Recreation district goes down

Despite an overwhelming voter rejection of a proposed Methow Valley Recreation District in last week’s special election, supporters haven’t given up.

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Remains found near Twisp

Remains believed to be those of a local man missing for nearly two years were found last Monday after the local police chief’s dog brought home a human skull. “From the evidence we found at the scene, we believe the remains are that of Nicholas A. Tortora, 21, of Twisp,” Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said. Police Chief Paul Budrow received a call around noon from his family, who said their dog had brought home the skull, Rogers said. Budrow lives about four miles south of town on state Highway 153.

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At last, city gets water

After more than 20 years of waiting due to a dispute over a paperwork snafu that resulted in a lawsuit settlement, the city will finally receive new water rights that could pave the way for development. City officials are poised to sign a 25-year contract Wednesday morning with the state Department of Ecology that will take the city from about 500 acre-feet of water per year to 1,100 acre-feet. “This additional water is taking care of a very limiting factor as far as potential growth, both residential and commercial,” Mayor Marilynn Lynn said. “The new water right also allows the rotation of water in all three city wells to provide increased service to our community. Together with our new wastewater treatment plant, the city of Bridgeport can now accommodate 165 new homes or equivalent businesses.” Under the new contract, the city will purchase the water at $60 per acre-foot from Sullivan Lake. The other option was to lease water rights from Lake Roosevelt. Buying the water outright means the city is locked into a fixed rate for the next 25 years, Lynn said. That allows the city to budget more accurately each year. The first payment to Ecology will be made in November. Issues over water rights in Bridgeport began when the Legislature passed the Claims Registration Act in 1967 to document water rights. The city fell out of compliance and submitted a new permit application instead of a specific form the state required. As a result, the city’s water rights were limited to 500 acre-feet per year. In May 2010, the city filed a lawsuit against Ecology in Douglas County Superior Court. A year later, the city agreed to drop its lawsuit by the end of 2014 if Ecology issued new water rights. Ecology Director Maia Bellon said the region has struggled to access new water on a river that must balance the needs of hydropower, irrigation and protecting endangered salmon. “It’s so nice to be here to deliver on a promise that secures Bridgeport’s future for many years to come,” she said. “We want to thank the city for its patience and legislators like Sen. (Linda) Parlette who are helping us make water available up and down the Columbia River – from farmers in the Odessa area to cities in north central Washington.” Because of fish mitigation needs, Ecology was unable to grant new water rights to towns along the Columbia River for a number of years. A moratorium was placed on new water rights in the early 1990s, around the time Brewster filed its own application for more water, Ecology spokeswoman Joye Redfield-Wilder said. The moratorium was lifted around 1998, but a new state rule required that all new withdrawals be approved after consultations with all interested parties, including state and federal agencies and tribal government.

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Ride kicks off ’49ers

Before thousands of people descend on Winthrop for ‘49er Days next weekend, about 150 horseback and wagon riders will spend four days traversing the countryside for the 16th annual Ride to Rendezvous. The ride kicks off Tuesday morning from the Methow Valley Rodeo arena on Twin Lakes Road. Riders will camp there Monday night in order to leave first thing, said Marva Mountjoy with Washington Outfitters and Guides. “We still have available slots” for the ride, she said Monday afternoon. The maximum number of riders is about 200. The Outfitters take a different route every year, and this one has been traveled about three times in the ride’s 16-year history, Mountjoy said. The riders will arrive in the town of Twisp at about 1 p.m. Tuesday, then go from there to the town cross, over Boulder Creek and up over the Rendezvous, with plans to arrive in Winthrop by noon Friday to kick off ‘49er Days weekend. “This particular route we did on our 10th anniversary,” she said. Despite registration being slightly down from last year, Mountjoy said there will be about 25 more wagon riders thanks to a positive review in a Seattle-area publication. Once the riders arrive in Winthrop, the festivities don’t end there. With horses and wagons, they’ll ride through the 69th annual ‘49er Days parade at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 10. At noon, the 26th annual Packers Rendezvous will kick off in the Winthrop Park, complete with mountain men camps, Old West displays, food and packing demonstrations. The Outfitters’ dinner will be at 5 p.m. in the park. On Sunday morning, they’ll host a cowboy breakfast from 8-10 a.m. in the park, followed immediately by a four-hour auction and state packing competition. There is a cost to participate in Ride to Rendezvous. Riders can bring their own horses and wagons, or rent horses from Washington Outfitters and Guides. Reservations must be made in advance. Guns, dogs, other pets and stallions are prohibited from the event. More information about the Ride to Rendezvous is available at www.woga.org.

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Hospital pays new CEO as ‘adviser’

Three Rivers Hospital is paying its next CEO, J. Scott Graham, $3,461 per week as a transition adviser before the commissioners can approve his employment contract next month.

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Woman accused of kidnapping

An Omak woman has been charged with holding two boys under a bed for several hours and threatening to kill them after accusing one of the boys of sexually assaulting her 3-year-old daughter.

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Man sentenced for Riverside holdup

The man who held up the Riverside Grocery last September and assaulted the owner pleaded guilty last week to first-degree robbery and harassment-threats to kill. Alex Anthony Sanchez, 38, pleaded guilty in Okanogan County Superior Court and was sentenced April 23 to 108 months — nine years — in prison for the Sept. 30, 2013, robbery. Although he allegedly left a folding-blade knife behind when he fled the robbery scene, a deadly weapon enhancement was dropped as part of his plea agreement. During the robbery last September, Sanchez entered the store, knocked down owner Kim Nagy and punched her, and escaped with an estimated $650 in cash from the till. The incident was caught on the store’s security cameras, but the robber was wearing sunglasses and had a bandana over his face. According to charging documents, deputy Tony Hawley said when he arrived at the store he saw medications knocked off the shelves to the floor, a vacuum cleaner knocked over and a folding-blade knife lying on the floor with the blade locked open. Nagy told him she’d been in the back when the suspect entered the store. She went to greet him, but he didn’t respond. He knocked her to the floor, and punched her in the head and face at least three times, court records show. She kicked back, but he allegedly told her to stop or he would kill her. Sanchez went to the cash register, pushed one button and opened it, and then took bills from it. As he was leaving, he again threatened to kill her. She said she went to the phone and called 911, and saw a van leaving. She flagged down a passing motorist, Darrel Armstrong, and asked him to try and find the vehicle but he could not. A witness reported seeing the van heading south on Old Riverside Highway at a high rate of speed. At the time, Sheriff Frank Rogers credited help from the public with identifying Sanchez as the suspect. “From the information obtained at the time and a video of the robbery that was put out to the public, the Sheriff’s Office has received several calls” about the thief, Rogers said at the time. Those who called in identified the robber as Sanchez. “We also knew that Sanchez drove a van which had been described to us by the victim of the robbery,” Rogers said. The Sheriff’s Office then put out the word to other agencies to look for Sanchez. He was arrested Oct. 2 by Oroville Police Chief Clay Warnstaff.

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Tuesday, April 29



Monday, April 28

  

Sunday, April 27

  

Wild Horses: Highlands herds cause concern

A half-dozen bands of feral horses are roaming the hills, trampling range land and potentially posing a health risk to other livestock. They’re not wild mustangs, but instead are former domestic animals or their offspring. And they’re causing conflict and consternation among local residents, and frustration for law enforcement officials. “People seem to think animals can adapt to their environment. They take a domestic horse out there, and they expect that” the horse can fend for itself, said Deputy Dave Yarnell, the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office’s designated animal officer. But newly released horses, accustomed to having human contact and bales of hay put out for them, don’t know what to do on their own. “They forage around. They don’t know where the shelter is, where the dangers are,” he said. He estimated there are 70-100 feral horses in the Aeneas Valley area of the Okanogan Highlands, and there have been reports of such animals in other parts of north Okanogan County. “We have had several reports over the years with wild horses, especially in that area,” Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said. “We have rounded up some over the years. There are a lot more up there.” Yarnell said feral horses can be a problem for ranchers. They eat forage on cattle grazing lands, thus making less for the cattle and stressing the land; get into springs developed for the cattle; trample native grasses; spread noxious weed seeds; damage wildlife habitat, and spread disease to other animals. One emaciated, feral horse showed up on someone’s property recently and collapsed. It was so sick it couldn’t move its head. “We thought at first it had strangles, which is highly contagious,” Yarnell said. Strangles is a bacterial upper respiratory disease also known as equine distemper. Further investigation showed the horse had an impacted molar, which led to further infection. The horse couldn’t eat and pretty much starved. It had to be put down. “That’s an example of what can happen. They can spread disease or they can suffer if injured,” he said. Another problem is with stallions, which lead the feral horse herds. They can impregnate pedigreed horses owned by breeders. Yarnell said one breeder had to abort several mares after a feral stallion visited the domestic herd. “We’ve had ranchers threaten to shoot them, but that might bring in predatory animals,” he said. “Besides, we don’t want dead horses everywhere.” On the other extreme, some people in the area feed the horses but don’t really own them. As long as the horses have the ability to move across the range, they’re considered feral. “It’s illegal for people to allow them to run at large, but there’s no crime to enforce unless the horse is branded,” Yarnell said. At that point, for branded animals, the state brand inspector can get involved. Rogers said responsibility for dealing with the feral horses lies with his office, but the costs involved can be prohibitive. The department has had a designated animal deputy, who also has other patrol duties, for less than a year and no additional budget for animal control. “We do what we can,” he said. “Deputy Yarnell has been working on this issue for several months and is trying to organize something to go and round up the horses. The biggest problem is money, but we are doing what we can.” Yarnell said a roundup looked promising for a while, when a non-profit rescue operation in Stevens County offered to come in, corral the horses and take them to be trained and adopted. “We started to put together a plan, then we found out they had some legal problems,” he said. He checked into having a professional roundup organization come in but was given a ballpark quote of $80,000 to $120,000. “It’s totally cost-prohibitive for the county to hire someone,” he said. In the meantime, Yarnell said the county encourages ranchers and interested parties to round up horses on an individual basis. “If they’re captured, people can keep them or take them to the sale yard,” he said. “The county can’t just house them.” He said the Sheriff’s Office can help facilitate roundups, and asks that he be kept in the loop if horses are rounded up. “We need to know they’re no longer at large,” he said. One ranch in the area did round up some of the horses, but eventually turned them back to the range when others in the area complained. Some people in the area don’t want the horses removed, but that’s not really a solution because of the range and health issues involved, Yarnell said. Nourishing Hand, a north end shelter with which the county contracts to care for abandoned and seized horses on a short-term, doesn’t have the facilities to deal with the feral horses, Yarnell said. There’s also been talk of creating a wild horse refuge, but that also poses problems since the horses then would be considered “owned,” he said. “How do you contain horses that don’t respect fences?” he said. “You need lots of land. Perimeter security would be needed.” The feral horses generally are well fed and in adequate health. “They’ve learned to adapt, but they’re mostly skittish,” he said. “Since it’s such a long-term situation, many are wild-born.” Compounding the problem is the continued dumping of horses. A couple showed up in Tunk Valley just recently. “People need to realize abandoning them is animal cruelty,” Yarnell said. “If they are caught in the act, there are serious consequences,” including felony prosecution. Okanogan County isn’t alone in having to deal with feral horses. The Colville Indian Reservation also is home to herds of such animals. The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs’ range office estimates there are around 1,000 feral horses on the reservation. The tribe recently received a $10,000 BIA grant for a count of the horses during the tribe’s annual helicopter count of game populations. BIA estimates every feral horse eats around 25 pounds of forage a day, or nearly 4.5 tons per year per horse.

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Life is full of those ‘almost’ moments

Have you ever had cold chills over something unpleasant that nearly happened but didn’t quite? I call it having an “almost.” This one happened some 50 or 60 years ago. I was working in a school of music in downtown Chicago, commuting from home, some 20 miles from home to work. One of the students invited me to her home for dinner. I went home, and got ready. My mother and I agreed that since it was a dinner invitation, it would be inappropriate for me to eat before going to the dinner. I caught the interurban, went to the proper stop, walked the few blocks to her house and knocked. She came to the door and exclaimed, “Elizabeth, you’re on time! Come in.” A little surprised at such a greeting, I did. Other people began to arrive, and presently there was a congenial group. But no sign of food. The evening wore on, and presently I realized that it was almost time for the last train. Making my excuses to the hostess, I left to walk to the train stop. For a time I had the feeling I was being followed. Arrival at the train stop ended that. I reached the station platform to see the light of my train just approaching that stop. With a gasp of relief, I got on. My mother gave me something to eat. I never got an explanation for the dinner that wasn’t, and the student and I have not kept in touch. I do not even know if she is still alive. Now, we jump many decades and half a continent to Okanogan County. Here people do not invite others to dinner and then forget it. They feed them when they have not been invited. There are people who, if you drop in for a visit, won’t let you go until they have offered refreshments. It’s sort of like having to eat your way out. And since there are wonderful cooks hereabout, this is a great pleasure. I think they would be horrified at not giving a guest something to eat after a visit. And it’s delicious. As I said, they are fine cooks. It’s one of the tenets of the code of hospitality out here, and there are no frightening almosts, of the kind here described, in visiting friends here. Elizabeth Widel is a columnist for The Chronicle. This is the 2,885th column in a series. She may be reached at 509-826-1110.

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April 27, 2014- Sports Briefs

<strong>Lion tennis wins</strong> WINTHROP – Liberty Bell won in girls tennis 3-2 and boys 5-0 over Entiat on Wednesday. Liberty Bell is at Wilson Creek on Tuesday. ----- TONASKET – Okanogan swept Tonasket in high school tennis Tuesday, claiming the girls’ victory 5-0 and the boys 3-2 on a pivotal match by Jose Alvarez. Alvarez won 3-6, 6-3 and 6-4 over Tonasket’s Walker Marks in No. 3 singles. Okanogan is at Lake Roosevelt and Omak is at Tonasket on Tuesday. ----- COULEE DAM – White Swan won 4-1 in girls tennis over Lake Roosevelt on Tuesday. ----- WILSON CREEK – Oroville won 3-0 in girls and 2-0 in boys tennis over Wilson Creek on Tuesday. Entiat is at Oroville on Thursday. ------------------------------ <strong>Omak golfers shine</strong> OKANOGAN – Omak easily moved past Quincy, 363-460, in a boys golf match Monday at Okanogan Valley Golf Course. Cameron Daigneau was medalist at 85, just in front of teammate Brandon Abrahamson at 88. “It was a great day of golf,” Omak coach Nick Popelier said. “The weather was great. The kids must have been enjoying it, because they took five hours to finish the round.” Also competing for Omak were Austin Hughes at 94 (personal best) and Wyatt Utt-Picking at 96. Omak’s lone girl, Gaby Reyes, carded a 141. ----- OKANOGAN – Okanogan High School finished with three golfers with 18-hole scores in a league match against Cascade on Tuesday. Joey Staggs was the lone boy covering 18 holes, finishing with a 98. For the girls, Vanessa VanderWeide shot a 99 and Ana Baum a 106. Junior varsity boys for nine holes included Abby Timm (76), Rowan Bauer (84) and Steven Roberts (101).

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Top bulls heading to Tonasket for Proctor PBR

I love when a handshake produces something like the Professional Bull Riders bringing the inaugural Shane Proctor Invitational to Tonasket on May 30-31. Paul Vickers approached Proctor, the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s world bull riding champion in 2011, during last year’s Omak Stampede rodeo in Omak. From that came the rodeo that will be the first PBR event in Tonasket. “It ought to be one whale of an event,” Vickers said. “I know it’s costing us enough to put it on. We need all the support we can get from the community.” Tonasket has had bulls in the past, but this event will bring many of the top riders to town seeking a big purse. The Tonasket Comancheros are putting up $10,000 to the purse. “We will have 35 bull riders a night,” Vickers said, said about 18 head of horses will be bucked, too. The Top 10 bull riders then advance to a short go-round each show. “The Northwest is rich in rodeo history, not only with the Omak Stampede and everything else,” said Lake Roosevelt High School graduate Proctor, 29, from his Mooresville, N.C., home. “Stand-alone bull riding is an exceptional thing. There are a lot of exceptional bulls raised in the Northwest. “That’s why PBR was created. The big draw for a lot of the crowd is bull riding.” Also, the overall winner will receive a free pass to the Built Ford Tough Series final. “What separates the PBR from everything else is the money involved,” Proctor said. “These are top elite athletes and they want to go up against the top elite bulls. Tonasket has put up the money to do it.” After talking with Proctor, Vickers and his wife, Teena, attended a PBR event. “It looked like a good event to do,” he said. PBR is taking entries, with Dakota Beck, Cody Riley and newcomer Ben Jones of Australia already signed, Vickers said. “I think we will have lot of guys that ride the Built Ford Tough series here,” Vickers said. PBR bulls are coming from as far away as North Dakota and South Dakota, including Guns and Donuts and Buck Wild from Silver Creek and Pandemic from C’N Stars Bull Co. Pucker Up and Jumanji are coming from 5 Star Bucking Bulls out of North Dakota. The Katich family will bring El Smacko and Dr. Love, which has bucked off 89 percent of its riders. Mike Corey is bringing Major Impact, Big Cool, Mr. Buddy, Rapid Revolver and Crazy Bull. Proctor anticipates being here, but he won’t be competing. He underwent surgery earlier this year to repair his free, left arm, which was stomped on the last ride in the 2011 world championship. He’s projected back July 1. “They said 24 weeks for recovery,” Proctor said. “I am hoping they release me a couple weeks early.” Proctor’s bull school in Nespelem earlier this month drew 31 young riders that bucked close to 250 head. Al Camp is the sports editor for The Chronicle. Email him at sports@omakchronicle.com.

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Brewster, Okanogan soccer on collision course

Ricardo Garcia finished with two goals and an assist in helping lead Brewster past Omak, 7-2, in a Caribou Trail League soccer match Tuesday. Cristian Talavera, Isidro Najera, Alex Mendez and Juan Perez also scored goals for the Bears. Luis Rosales had two assists and Luis Orozco an assist. Bear goalkeeper Victor Chacon had three saves in the first half. Edgar Arroyo had a save in the second half in goal. German Ramirez for Omak scored on a free kick and on an assist from Jose Galvan. Galvan finished with 13 saves on 21 shots by Brewster. “The guys played well,” Omak coach Chris Werner said. “The second half was like night and day. They came out with energy and attacked. This was a huge improvement. This was also our senior night. We celebrated German Ramirez and Carlos Avila and their families.” Omak (0-11 overall, 0-9 league), which finishes the season with five straight road games, is at Tonasket (5-6, 3-6) and Brewster (8-2, 7-2) is at Okanogan (9-2, 7-2) on Tuesday. ----- TONASKET – Okanogan soccer kept itself tied for second place with Brewster following a 4-1 victory over Tonasket on Tuesday in Caribou Trail League play. Tonasket led 1-0 when Okanogan’s Justin Rivas scored off an assist from Jorge Marquez. Rivas scored the next three goals off assists from Jason Perez. “Defensively, we struggled at first, but then the we made some adjustments,” Okanogan coach Dean Klepec said. “Then we did a better job of not allowing them easy shots on goal. When they got shots Enrique Vargas made some great saves.” The league tie should be broken this Tuesday when Brewster (8-2 overall, 7-2 league) goes to Okanogan (9-2, 7-2). ----- OROVILLE – Bridgeport topped Oroville, 9-1, in a league match Monday. “Once they got up by four goals, I started putting in my bench and giving the younger players time,” Oroville coach Mike Pitts said. Liberty Bell (9-2 overall, 3-0 league) is at Bridgeport (6-3, 1-1) on Tuesday.

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Quincy track speeds at Tonasket meet

Quincy dominated a Caribou Trail League track meet Wednesday, taking both the boys and girls team titles. The Tonasket boys went 1-4 in the 400, led by Ryan Rylie (53.93). Beau Cork (55.36) was second, Smith Condon (56.29) was third and Devyn Catone (56.54) was fourth. Okanogan’s Mason Guerrette won the long jump (19-1). Tonasket girls winning included Kylie Dellinger in the 1,600 (5:50.33) and Rose Walts in the 100 hurdles (16.77). Okanogan girls won the 4x100 relay (53.90) with Satya Kent, Emmy Engle, Cayden Diefenbach and Keanna Egbert and the 4x200 relay (1:54.10) with Alexis Jones, Egbert, Diefenbach and Engle. The Tonasket Invitational is planned for Tuesday. Boys team scores: 1, Quincy 232. 2, Chelan 147. 3, Tonasket 113. 4, Okanogan 84. Girls team scores: 1, Quincy 196.5. 2, Okanogan 153. 3, Chelan 150. 4, Tonasket 105.5. ----- MANSFIELD – The Iceberg Invitational meet was postponed Tuesday. It’s been rescheduled for this Tuesday.

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Evans pitches 3-hitter over Mustangs

Pateros blanked Bridgeport, 10-0, in six innings of baseball Wednesday. Lance Evans collected the win, striking out 8, walking 4 and giving up 3 hits. “He definitely pitched a really good game,” Pateros coach Bob VanLith said. “He had control the whole game.” The game had been slated for Tuesday, but was pushed back a day because of rain. C.J. Wall was 2-3 for Pateros, which took advantage of 10 Bridgeport walks. Miguel Garza was 1-1 for the Mustangs. Pateros is the lone north 1B school competing in the Central Washington 2B League. The Billygoats enter their own playoffs in the postseason, taking on the top south 1B team of either Soap Lake or Waterville. The state 1B tournament is a finals, not a four-team playoff over two days, VanLith said. “We’re used to playing 2B teams,” the coach said. “It’s what we’ve always done. We’ve always been quite small. It’s good competition, makes us tougher in the end.” Pateros (7-1 overall, 6-1 league) will get an opportunity to test the league’s best 2B team so far this season at Liberty Bell (9-3, 7-0) on Tuesday. Pateros (10) – Wall 2-3; Evans 1-2; Piechalski 1-3; Gelstin 1-4, 2RBI; Eberhardt 1-1. Bridgeport (0) – M. Garza 1-1; Evenson 1-2; E. Martinez 1-2. ----- WINTHROP – Liberty Bell took out Lake Roosevelt, 6-1, on Tuesday in a showdown between the Top 2 baseball teams in the Central Washington 2B League. “We made too many errors to beat a quality team like Liberty Bell,” Lake Roosevelt coach Billy Nicholson said. “Their second baseman made a diving catch off a soft line drive to save at least two runs. It was a great play.” Oroville (1-13 overall, 1-9 league) is at Lake Roosevelt (7-4, 6-2) and, in a test between two of the best teams in the league, Pateros (7-1, 6-1) is at Liberty Bell (9-3, 7-0) on Tuesday. ----- TONASKET – Okanogan threw three pitchers while its bats knocked out 12 hits to dispatch Tonasket, 9-0, in a league game Tuesday. “We were able to score runs because we put the ball in play,” Okanogan coach Ed Ashworth said. Cody Sumner (4I, 2K, 2BB, 3H) got the win. Clay Ashworth (2I, 1H) and Tyler Wood (1I, 3 batters) closed out the game. John Rawley (1BB, 3ER, 7H) opened on the mound for the Tigers, which committed five errors. Jimmy Coleman (2K, 0BB, 2ER) pitched the final three innings. Clay Ashworth led Okanogan at the plate, going 3-3 with two doubles. Jim Townsend was 3-4 with a double. Okanogan (7-4 overall, 4-3 league) is at league-leading Cashmere (12-1, 7-0) and Quincy (4-9, 1-6) is at Tonasket (6-6, 2-5) on Tuesday. Okanogan (9) – Fingar 1-4; Wood 1-3, R, B, SB; Ashworth 3-3, 2 2B, 3R, RBI, 2SB; Townsend 3-4, 2B, 2R, 3RBI, 2SB; Sumner 2R, SB; Lawson 2-3, R, RBI; Cate 1-3, RBI; Rubert 1-2, RBI. Tonasket (3) – Williams 1-3; Rawley 1-3; Cory 1-2, BB; Pershing BB; Hockett BB. ----- OROVILLE – The Manson at Oroville baseball game was postponed from Tuesday until Thursday because of heavy rain. Manson won the game, 10-2. More in Wednesday’s Chronicle. Oroville (1-13 overall, 1-9 league) is at Lake Roosevelt (7-4, 6-2) on Tuesday.

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Debates continue over historic dam

Exploring the area around Enloe Dam and Similkameen Falls, it’s easy to see why it draws in people who love the outdoors. Roads leading from the highway are primitive and tend to flood in a few spots during especially rainy seasons, but there are numerous walking trails surrounding the falls and opportunities for bird watching, not to mention checking out the historic dam and powerhouse built more than 90 years ago. The dam hasn’t generated power since 1958, when the Okanogan County Public Utility District opted to shut it down and buy power more cheaply from Bonneville Power Administration. The powerhouse is dilapidated, the bridge that connected it to the other side of the river long gone. Since then, there have been countless discussions and a few attempts to get a powerhouse up and running again. After a five-year application process with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the utility secures a 50-year license in July 2013 to generate electricity. Previous licenses were granted in 1983 and 1996, but were rescinded because there were no studies done on the impacts to anadromous fish. Although commissioners still haven’t decided whether to restore the dam or breach it, and water issues are still caught up in litigation, the utility is moving forward with meeting FERC license deadlines. Under terms of the license, if the commissioners decide to go ahead and operate the dam – a project that carries a roughly estimated cost of about $35 million – construction must begin by July 2015 and be completed three years later. The project includes plans for two penstocks, a substation, a new powerhouse and tailrace, an intake channel, a bypass reach and five-foot crest gates to boost generation. But the scope of the license involves more than just the dam, according to utility Regulatory and Environmental Affairs Director Dan Boettger. It also includes guidelines and requirements for fish mitigation, recreation and water quality, among other things. One challenge the utility will have to address, he said, is the temperature of the Similkameen River, which can sometimes be fatally high for fish. Because the nearby Okanogan River is even warmer, the Similkameen is a “cold water refuge” for fish, including endangered steelhead, trying to make their way upstream, Boettger said. Utility employees have discovered small pockets of cold water welling up into the stream beds, where fish like to congregate to survive the hotter summer months before moving on, but more work is required. One major project will involve drilling a well to pump cold water into the stream bed. “All of the fish agencies are actually very excited to see this thing get done,” Boettger said. “The lower Similkameen is important habitat for salmonid.” Another required project is bringing in more gravel to help fish safely spawn and house their eggs. Above the dam itself, the utility would install an intake channel with a wide opening that narrows as it descends into the penstocks and new powerhouse planned on the southeast side of the dam. Part of the reason for the wider channel opening, Boettger said, is to slow down the water flow and give fish a chance to turn around and swim back up the reservoir. In addition, the intake won’t need to be as deep, meaning less sediment disruption. Such measures are part of what he referred to as “P, M and E” – prevention, mitigation and enhancement. “We’re trying to avoid fish impacts,” he said. More recreation spots, including a park, small campground and boat launch, are planned for the wooded area northeast of the dam and at Miners Flat. The projects come at the request of the Bureau of Land Management, which owns the land where Enloe Dam sits, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Those projects, however, may be the opposite of what people who use the area want. Boettger said the utility has surveyed people during peak recreation times. “They wanted us to maintain it as you see it today,” he said. “We have tried to honor that, but we’ve gotten some pressure from agencies that want more recreational amenities.” A recreation plan is due in July, as are some other tasks. “We’re currently meeting all of the dates that FERC assigned to us,” he said. Boettger estimates the dam would become economical in about 20 years. It would generate a maximum of 9 megawatts between two 4.5-megawatt generators, which could provide electricity to about 3,500 homes. As for the old powerhouse, Boettger said the utility initially wanted to rebuild it and use it, but can’t. Instead, the plan is to advertise it for sale over a five-year period. If no buyers come forward, it will be removed. “We’re trying to come up with ways to make everyone happy,” he said. A number of ratepayers believe the project isn’t a financially wise move and have asked the utility to remove the dam altogether. However, Boettger said there’s a chance for the utility to recoup some of its investment if the dam is operational, whereas spending a similar amount of money to remove it would be a total loss. Jere Gillespie with the Columbia River Bioregional Education Project, which issued a study pointing out the economic problems surrounding the dam, said a proposal to remove Enloe has been created. “The draft proposal has been submitted to PUD management, and contains an outline of other dams removed in the Northwest recently, the costs of those removals, and other such details,” she said, noting the document has not been made public yet. “Then the removal of Enloe itself is considered, and a timeline of objectives is offered. Also, potential funding sources are outlined and partners are identified.” In February, the Hydropower Reform Coalition was invited along with several agencies to take part in a discussion about the possibility of removing the dam. Representatives from the Bonneville Power Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, state Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management all said they would support removing the dam if the utility chooses to go that route, but no one was able to contribute funding to accomplish it. The Colville Confederated Tribes spoke in favor of reopening the dam. The tribe and utility signed a memorandum of understanding in 2009 that would allow the tribe to purchase, at cost, up to 49 percent of the power generated. As a public entity, the utility cannot sell power for profit. Meanwhile, Boettger said there’s still a legal issue ongoing regarding cubic feet per second going over the dam. The utility does not comment on pending litigation. Some legal battles have been settled over the past year. In January, American Whitewater dropped its appeal in federal court that claimed FERC didn’t consider the impacts of the minimum required flow of the falls. The appeal was dropped in an effort to open communication with the utility. The state Pollution Control Hearings Board issued an order July 23, 2013, requiring the state Department of Ecology and the utility to conduct an aesthetic flow study within the next three years, then amend the minimum required flow if necessary. Advocacy groups argue 10-30 cubic feet per second (cfs) isn’t enough flow, and that the permit failed to comply with the Clean Water Act. Since then, the utility has secured a Clean Water Act permit, Boettger said. To obtain the full 9 megawatts, the utility has a water right of 1,000 cfs, but an additional 600 cfs is needed. He said the dam could be created for a smaller amount of production that would use less water, but that may prevent the dam from becoming solvent.

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April 27, 2014- News of Record

<strong>From Brewster Police</strong> Department reports April 24 Vehicle crash on South Seventh Street. Medical call on Hospital Way. April 23 Malicious mischief on South Seventh Street. April 22 Trespassing on South Bridge Street. Malicious mischief on South Seventh Street. Theft on South Fourth Street. Malicious mischief on South Seventh Street. Laundry room damaged. April 19 Property damage on West Griggs Avenue. Baseball went through a window. April 18 Fire on Hospital Way at State Way. ----- <strong>From Coulee Dam Police Department</strong> reports April 24 Malicious mischief on Yucca Street. Rock thrown through a window. April 23 Assault on Roosevelt Way. April 21 Burglary on Columbia Avenue. ----- <strong>From Oroville Police Department reports</strong> April 24 Lost property on Main Street. April 23 Burglary on Main Street. Medications taken. Theft on Golden Street. Camera, jewelry, coins and other items taken. April 22 Fire on Emery Road. Power pole on fire. April 21 Found property on 23rd Avenue. April 20 Attempted suicide on Kay Street. April 19 Property damage on Main Street. April 18 Theft on Main Street. Vehicle crash on Main Street. Theft on Main Street. ----- <strong>From Tonasket Police Department reports</strong> April 24 Illegal burning on South Tonasket Avenue at East Third Street. April 19 Boy bitten by a dog on North Whitcomb Avenue. April 18 Assault on Fifth Street. ----- <strong>From Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office complaints</strong> April 21 Sheep attacked and killed during the night on Kermel Road, Omak. April 20 Vehicle theft on South Fourth Avenue, Okanogan. Theft on First Street, Riverside. Fuel tank and gas can taken. Vehicle prowl on U.S. Highway 97, Oroville. Fire on Riverside Cutoff Road, Riverside. Woman and dogs attacked by a neighbor’s pit bull on Wilson Road, Winthrop. Theft on Balmes Road, Oroville. TV taken. Malicious mischief on South Third Avenue, Okanogan. Assault on South Second Avenue, Okanogan. Malicious mischief on South Second Avenue, Okanogan. April 19 Burglary on Sky Lane, Okanogan. Assault on Conconully Road, Okanogan. Vehicle crash on Malott Eastside Road, Okanogan. Medical call on South Second Avenue. Unattended death on Koala Avenue, Omak. April 18 Vehicle crash on Old Highway 97 at Pioneer Road, Brewster. Burglary on Tunk Creek Road, Riverside. Vehicle crash on Rodeo Trail Road at Armory Junction Road, Okanogan. Assault on Ed Louis Road, Okanogan. Burglary on Sawtooth Lane, Winthrop. April 17 Burglary on South Fourth Avenue, Okanogan. TV taken, dryer moved. Assault on Molson Road, Oroville. Vehicle crash on Chesaw Road. Citizen assist on Glenwood Avenue, Riverside. Man fell out of a truck. Assault on Hagood Cutoff Road, Tonasket. Theft on Eastlake Road, Oroville. April 16 Theft on Main Street, Riverside. Theft on Miller Road, Omak. Hay taken. Vehicle crash on North Sixth Avenue, Okanogan. Vehicle hit a rock wall and knocked a boulder into a driveway. Assault on Old Highway 97, Okanogan. Animal problem on Summit Lake Road, Tonasket. Two dogs shot. April 15 Theft on South Second Avenue, Okanogan. Burglary on U.S. Highway 97, Brewster. Burglary on Monse Bridge Road, Brewster. ID, Social Security card, money taken. Theft on Tyee Street, Okanogan. Speakers taken. Fraud on Sunrise Heights Road, Okanogan. Social Security number used by another person. Fire on county Highway 7, Tonasket. April 14 Theft on Twisp-Winthrop Eastside Road, Winthrop. Three bicycles taken. Fire on Miller’s Lane, Oroville. Assault on North Second Avenue, Okanogan. Assault on Elmway, Okanogan. ----- <strong>From Winthrop Marshal’s</strong> Office reports April 18 Forgery on Riverside Avenue.

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April 27, 2014- Business Briefs

Three Rivers board discusses CEO pact BREWSTER – Three Rivers Hospital commissioners plan to discuss a draft contract with their top choice for CEO, J. Scott Graham, during their regular monthly meeting Monday. Citing “retaliatory conduct” from Coulee Medical Center board members and physicians, Graham resigned as CEO of that facility on April 10 and indicated he plans to sue the facility. Other agenda items include a transition contract for Graham; a public hearing on the amended 2014 final budget; review of the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and obstetrics departments, and the sale of Advantage Durable Medical Equipment. The meeting will be at 4 p.m. at the Hillcrest Administration Building, 415 Hospital Way. ----- Brewster begins spring cleanup week BREWSTER – The city has announced a spring cleanup week, starting tomorrow. Crews will pick up yard debris left in the alleys – meaning only grass clippings, limbs, leaves, dead plants and short boards without nails. Debris should not be bagged; piles will be inspected for unwanted materials. The city will use a front-end loader to pick up the debris, so piles should be placed away from walls, fences and wires. ----- Pateros board meets in Methow PATEROS – The Pateros School Board will meet at 6 p.m. Monday at the Methow Community Center, located in the old schoolhouse off state Highway 153. The board plans second readings and possible adoption of several policies, and will consider a language arts curriculum for the elementary school and renewing Superintendent Lois Davies’ contract, among other topics. ----- Brewster board considers board vacancy BREWSTER – The Brewster School Board will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the high school library, 503 S. Seventh St. Agenda items include appointing a new board member and proposed action on a sixth-grade trip to Conconully camp.

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Coach arrested by Colville tribe

Officials with the Omak School District and Economic Alliance are taking a wait-and-see attitude in the wake of boys basketball coach and alliance board Chairman Kyle W. Desautel’s arrest by Colville Tribal Police. Desautel, 35, was arrested April 13 on suspicion of disobedience of a lawful court order and resisting arrest or process. Tribal Police Cmdr. Tom Holsworth said Desautel was arrested under tribal code. He has since been released. “The case is still under investigation and no further information is being released at this time,” Holsworth said. Desautel could not be reached for comment. Omak High School Athletic Director Nick Popelier declined to comment, other than to say he is investigating how to proceed. Principal David Kirk said the situation is a personnel matter. He declined to comment and did not respond to a question of whether Desautel is still coaching. Desautel also serves as chairman of the Economic Alliance board and on the Okanogan County Tourism Council. The two entities share some staff. Alliance Executive Director Roni Holder-Diefenbach said Desautel continues to serve on both boards. She declined further comment.

April 27, 2014 midnight read more..


Voters support medical services

While local voters continue to support emergency medical services in Tuesday’s special election, other measures such as a school bond request and a proposed recreation district are failing. As of Friday’s second round of ballot counts, the Douglas Okanogan County Fire District No. 15 EMS levy was passing, 76 percent to 23 percent among 614 rural residents of the two-counties. The levy is a six-year continuation of the current levy, an amount of 47 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. Brewster and Pateros residents are also passing matching levy requests for District No. 15 EMS that will be funneled through each city. In Brewster, 175 residents cast their ballots as of Friday, with 77 percent in favor and about 22 percent against. Ninety-two Pateros voters are passing it 79-21 percent. “I’m very, very grateful for all of the support to keep us going and keep us here for another six years,” EMS Director Tonya Vallance said. In Ferry County, rural residents of EMS District No. 1 are passing a medical care and ambulance services levy, with about 83 percent voting yes. Republic voters are approving a city version of the same levy request, with 73 percent voting yes. If approved, the levy would cost 47 cents per year per $1,000 of assessed property valuation over a six-year period. A three-year general fund levy of $18,325 for the Keller School District is also passing, about 73 percent to 27 percent. Ninety-six votes had been cast as of Tuesday. If approved, the levy, about $1 per $1,000, would be collected starting next year. Meanwhile, Bridgeport School District’s proposed $3.9 million bond issue to reconstruct part of the elementary school is failing for a second time, 53 percent to 47 percent. The measure needs a supermajority of 60 percent to pass. A similar bond issue was rejected in February despite also having more than 50 percent support. “Bridgeport School District will continue to provide a quality education for kids,” Superintendent Scott Sattler said. “We will have to get a bit creative to provide a positive and healthy learning space for kids and staff, but we are making plans to make that happen. Of course it is disappointing the bond failed, but we have to respect the vote and move forward in a positive manner.” The 20-year bond would have cost property owners about $1.84 per $1,000 of assessed property valuation. With help from the state, the school district would have used the bond proceeds to remove temporary portable buildings added to the elementary school, built in the 1970s, and rebuild that portion of the school with 16 classrooms, kitchen improvements, an updated playground and a computer lab, multi-purpose room and music room. In the Methow Valley, residents have overwhelmingly turned down a proposition to create a new recreation district. As of Friday, 80 percent of voters opposed forming the Methow Valley Recreation District, which would have been a junior taxing district sharing boundaries with the school district. Julie Muyllaert, one of the candidates running to serve on the board of directors if the recreation district was approved, said she was disappointed by the results but understood that residents had a number of concerns. “I heard from a lot of people that they support the idea of funding recreation in the Methow Valley, but were uncomfortable with the district structure prescribed by the specific state law and that they would have felt more comfortable voting for a specific plan with a budget,” she said. Part of the purpose of creating the recreation district was to allow for more local control in creating new recreational opportunities while finding ways to help fund existing, popular facilities, such as Wagner Memorial Pool in Twisp and the Winthrop Ice and Sports Rink. As a junior taxing district, the recreation district could have collected up to 75 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value starting in 2015. Voters were also asked to select five at-large commissioners to serve in case the proposition passed. The frontrunners as of Tuesday were Don Fitzpatrick for Position 1, Christine Holm for Position 2, Steven Stacy for Position 3, Bart Bradshaw for Position 4 and Paula Stokes for Position 5. Okanogan County voter turnout was nearly 44 percent as of Tuesday, with 2,451 ballots counted and about 383 left to count. Douglas County reported more than 54 percent voter turnout, with 460 ballots counted and about 10 remaining. Ferry County is seeing a nearly 49 percent turnout so far, with 1,112 ballots counted and an estimated 25 left. Special election results will be certified May 6.

April 27, 2014 midnight read more..


PUD nixes salary plan

After signing a new union contract earlier this month, Okanogan County Public Utility District commissioners have opted not to approve new salary ranges for non-union employees this year. Utility commissioners considered a resolution Monday that would have changed the potential range of salaries within the employee compensation program based on the current market value of those jobs. The new contract with Local 77 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, approved April 7, carries with it a $185,000 budget adjustment, but the resolution proposed Monday would not have resulted in immediate raises for those non-union positions. “Underscore, it does not equate to wage increases to individual employees,” General Manager John Grubich said at the start of the discussion. Raises are based on performance evaluations and merit, Grubich said, noting that the review is typically done every year to ensure the utility is up to date and doesn’t suffer “sticker shock” when industry salaries increase. “As we evaluate each individual employee and their contribution to the organization, we also take a look and say, what is the market telling us that position is?” he said. Commissioner Ernest Bolz moved to approve the resolution with the caveat that the employee compensation program should be reviewed every other year in the future, rather than annually to save on consulting fees. His motion died for lack of a second. “I like every other year, but I just don’t feel this year is the year to be doing it,” Commissioner David Womack said, adding that the lower end of the salary ranges has been going up every year. The resolution outlined salary ranges for 31 positions, from technicians, engineers and assistants to finance department employees, several managers and three directors – in accounting, engineering and power resources. There are 45 non-union employees and 47 who belong to a collective bargaining unit, Grubich said in an interview. Proposed salaries ranged from a minimum of $38,692 and a maximum of $55,805 for a Grade 7 employee, to a minimum $117,417 and a maximum $180,218 for a Grade 20 director, according to the draft resolution. After reviewing salary ranges over the past three years, Bolz said, “My concern is, looking at that, only one of those – and that was for the Grade 20 – came anywhere within the range for the union steps over the same period, and the others exceeded that considerably. “I’m wondering if we’re pushing up the bottom of the ranges faster than we need to for the economy and for what labor contracts have been negotiated, etc.” “I’m surprised that those outweigh the union contracts because the last six years, linemen had been averaging 3 percent a year, and … the market tends to go up and down,” Grubich said. “If one of those employees gets hired away, they get a big pay raise to go to work for somebody else.” He used the utility’s recent search for a new engineer as an example – a position that drew candidates who were paid above the proposed mid-point salary being considered, Grubich said. “There’s little use in trying to attract someone like that if we’re not going to pay that type of wage,” he said. “Unfortunately, it’s the Pacific Northwest market, it’s not the Okanogan County market. That’s the utility industry.” “I see your point about an engineer; you’re competing in the Northwest market,” board Chairman Steve Houston said, noting that the proposed salary ranges for some lower-paid positions were about 15 percent higher than in 2011. “But grades 7-14, or even 7-10 – that’s a local market, and I don’t think any of my ratepayers that I’ve talked to have seen even double digits in that same time frame, let alone 18, 17, 16 percent.” Grubich said utility employees have not seen double-digit wage increases over that time. Houston also spoke out during the April 7 meeting against approving the budget adjustment for unionized employees’ compensation increases. According to the meeting minutes, Houston said, “at this time … he would rather find the funding somewhere else in the budget over the next few months, even if it is taken from the capital improvements.” On the other hand, Womack and Bolz said they understood during the budget process late last year that wage increases were not included, so an amendment would be needed once a union agreement was reached. They voted in favor of the agreement, while Houston voted against it. The previous agreement expired March 31, and the new one is in effect through March 31, 2017.

April 27, 2014 midnight read more..

Friday, April 25

 

Thursday, April 24

      

Okanogan shocks Quincy

By Al Camp The Chronicle OKANOGAN – Okanogan moved up the Caribou Trail League soccer standings by handing Quincy its first loss of the season, 5-1, Saturday. “We did a great job defensively, keeping the ball on their side of the field and not allowing them easy opportunities to score,” Okanogan coach Dean Klepec said. “When they got shots off, (goalkeeper) Enrique Vargas (12 saves) made great saves.” “Our midfield also did a great job of pressuring them and distributing the ball and as did our forwards who finished well.” Jason Perez got the Bulldogs on the board on an assist from Fabian Rodriguez. After Quincy tied the match, Justin Rivas scored from Perez before Perez scored from Rivas for a 3-1 halftime lead. Both goals in the second half came with Vargas booting to Perez, who passed to Rivas for the score. Quincy beat Okanogan 4-3 in March. Okanogan (7-2 overall, 6-2 league) is at Liberty Bell (8-1) for a non-league match Thursday then hosts Chelan (5-4-1, 5-3) on Saturday. ----- BREWSTER – Brewster stayed in the running for the Caribou Trail League boys soccer title with a 4-1 win Saturday over Cascade. The Bears controlled the ball and used 17 shots on goal to get its points, assistant coach David Garcia said. “We need to work on finishing,” he said. Ricardo Garcia scored two goals and had an assist. Jonathan Sanchez scored and had an assist. Luis Rosales scored. Victor Chacon finished with five saves following seven shots on goal by Cascade. Cashmere (3-7 overall, 2-6 league) is at Brewster (6-1, 5-1) on Saturday. ----- CHELAN – Chelan walloped Omak, 10-0, in a league soccer match Saturday. The Goats finished with 46 shots on goal, Chelan assistant coach Jim Broome said. Omak (0-10 overall, 0-8) is at Quincy (6-3, 6-1) for a league game Saturday. ----- MANSON – Manson slipped past Bridgeport, 4-3, in a league soccer game Saturday. Liberty Bell (8-1 overall, 2-0 league) is at Bridgeport (5-3, 1-1) on March 29. ----- WINTHROP – Liberty Bell knocked off Oroville, 7-4, in a league soccer match Thursday. “For the coaching staff, it was good to see that we had scoring opportunities that weren’t there the first game,” Oroville coach Mike Pitts said. “Liberty Bell is first in the league for a reason. They’re a good team and move the ball well. “Okanogan (7-2) is at Liberty Bell (8-1) for a non-league match Thursday. Manson (2-3 overall, 1-0 league) is at Oroville (1-5-2, 0-2) on Saturday. ----- CASHMERE – Tonasket edged Cashmere, 2-1, in a shootout for a league soccer victory Thursday. Marcelino Ruiz, Noe Vazquez and Abran Alvarez “played awesome” on defense, coach Jack Goyette said. “Derek Sund was fantastic in the goal,” the coach said. Isaiah Albright scored on a corner assisted by Cesar Reynoso during regulation.

April 24, 2014 midnight read more..

Wednesday, April 23



Taylor Woodstone Job Fair

The Colville Confederated Tribes and Taylor Woodstone will be hosting a job fair: When: Wednesday, April 30, two sessions: from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

April 23, 2014 2:33 p.m. read more..
  

April 23, 2014- Academic honors

The Chronicle CHENEY — Eastern Washington University has named its winter quarter dean’s list. Brewster — Monica Martinez, Maritsal Arellano, Jose Ortiz Villagrana and Lindsey Valdovinos. Bridgeport — Daiana Campos. Coulee City — Kody Prather. Coulee Dam — Karah Duclos, Taylor Black, Connor Crim, Luke Night Wolf and Erica VanZyverden. Mansfield — Connor Smith. Okanogan — Joshua McDonald, Brendan Colbert, Joshua Patterson, Carolyn Burke, Zoe Cheeseman and Mindy Widell. Omak — Miles Hansen, Lindsey Barry, Brianna Navarro and Brett Liebrecht. Oroville — Jayden Smith, Callie Barker, Zachary Speiker, Anamae Rood, Janna Thurston and Heather Galvan-Guzman. Pateros — Jacob Cruz. Republic — Raine Knowles. Tonasket — Mackenzie Black, Michelle Carlson, Christina Ledezma, Brenda Ramos and Michelle Jones. Winthrop — Alex Ulmer, Connor Fisher, Christopher Richardson and John Hutchinson.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..
 

First blossom run set for Saturday

Roads north and west of the city on the flat will be full of runners Saturday morning for the inaugural Orchards in Bloom half-marathon and 10K races. The races start and finish at RockWall Cellars, 110 Nichols Road. Race start time is 8 a.m. Organizers are encouraging community members to show up on the race course to cheer on the runners or to RockWall Cellars and enjoy the festivities of the event. Entries have been received from around the state and from Idaho, Montana and Colorado, race spokeswoman Racie McKee said. The 10K circles near the business while the half-marathon weaves throughout the area, going as far north as Peacock Lane off Old Riverside Highway and south to Weatherstone Road, spokeswoman Nancy Nash-Mendez said. Omak Fit4Life Coalition, a local community group collaborating to provide free and low-cost health education and wellness activities, is organizing the event. “People can register for the race until the 23rd of April (today) by going to the omakorchardsinbloom.org website to be chip timed,” McKee said. “Late entries are accepted until race day without chip-timing.” Omak Warrior Stampede is providing the timing chips. All finishers will receive a race shirt and finisher medal. Awards include RockWall Cellars wine for first place in 21-and-over age groups. Trophies go to first place for those in under age 21 age groups. Ribbons go to first through third places. Race packets can be picked up 4-6 p.m. Friday at the Best Western Peppertree, 820 Koala Ave. Dr. France Cokan, 83 and 10-time Ironman World Champion, will be a keynote speaker 5-6 p.m. during a wellness presentation at the Peppertree. “Dr. Cokan will share his personal journey on how he became a world champion and how he keeps healthy and competition ready, even at his age,” McKee said. Cokan will be running the half-marathon. He has set three world records in the world championships in Kona, Hawaii. “All community members are welcome to attend Dr. Cokan’s presentation,” McKee said. Those wishing to participate in shorter distances can participate in the fifth annual Hoofin’ and Woofin’ 1-mile and 5K routes at 10 a.m. Sunday in nearby Riverside. Participants are encouraged to bring their four-legged friends to the race, which starts and ends in the city park. Registration can be done prior to the event. For more information about either event contact McKee at 509-826-7680.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


Boyd drills walk-off homer

Omak stuck with pitcher Rhaney Harris and used a three-run, walk-off home run by Nashoni Boyd for a 6-5 non-league softball victory Saturday over Nooksack Valley. “This was a well-played game by both teams,” Omak coach Rick Duck said. “Nooksack is a good team and they took advantage of the free bases we gave them to manufacture some runs.” The westside Pioneers led 3-0 in the top of the third before Omak got its first run in the bottom of the inning. Omak trailed, 5-3, when Boyd drilled her winning home run. Omak finished with 12 hits and 2 errors compared to 2 hits and no errors by Nooksack Valley. Harris finished with 8 walks, 2 hits and 5 runs in seven innings. “Harris struggled early, but was able to re-group and get the job done,” Duck said. Omak (5-6 overall, 2-4 league) is at Quincy (3-8, 0-5) for a league doubleheader Saturday. Omak (6) — Ken. Duck 3-4; Zacherle 2-4, 2B; Kruse 1-3, 2B; Keaton 1-4; N. Boyd 2-4, 5RBI, HR; Reed 1-3; Jackson 1-3, 2B; Ables 1-3, 2B. ----- QUINCY – Okanogan drilled Quincy, 12-2 and 22-4, in a Caribou Trail League softball doubleheader Saturday. “Overall, it was a good day for us,” Okanogan coach Darin Radke said. “We made some mistakes defensively that we will need to fix this week. All six runs we gave up in the doubleheader were unearned. “Offensively, from the third inning of the first game on, we hit the ball very well,” he said. Makenzie Norwill struck out 7, walked none and yielded 4 hits in the five-inning opener. She struck out 4, walked one over two innings of the second game. Brooklyn Bauer finished the final three innings, striking out 4, walking 1. Okanogan (8-2 overall, 5-0 league) is at Chelan (6-6, 4-2) on Friday. Okanogan (12) — Bauer 1-2; Moses 1-3, 2B; Morris 2-3, 2B; Oules 2-4; Gray 2-2, 2B. Okanogan (22) – Bauer 2-4, HR; Moses 3-5, 2B; Norwill 3-5, 2B, 3B; Morris 3-4, 2 2B; Oules 2-3, 2B; Gray 3-4, 2B; Erks 2-3, 2B; Bryson 1-3. ----- CASHMERE – Cashmere tossed two softball shut-outs at Tonasket, 12-0 and 10-0, on Saturday. Cashmere took advantage of errors and walks in both games. The Bulldogs got 2 hits in the opener and only 3 hits in the second game, but did not commit an error in either matchup. Tonasket committed 5 errors to go with one hit in the opener. The Tigers got another hit to go with four errors in the second game. Cascade (5-5 overall, 3-3 league) is at Tonasket (1-11, 0-6) for two games Saturday. ----- BREWSTER – Cascade swept Brewster, 11-3 and 10-8, in league play Saturday. No other information was received. Cashmere (9-3 overall, 6-0 league) is at Brewster (4-7, 3-3) on Wednesday. ----- CURLEW – Curlew drilled Northport, 22-0 and 14-2, in a league softball doubleheader Saturday. The Cougars knocked out 22 hits in the opener, which included 17 runs in the second inning. Haleigh Gibson and Kayleona Fanning each hit triples for Curlew. Fanning struck out nine in four innings. In the second game, Curlew used 8 hits and 8 Northport errors to end the game in five innings. Lindsey Gibson doubled and got the pitching win for the Cougars. Wilbur-Creston (1-4 overall, 0-2 league) is at Curlew (7-1, 4-0) on Saturday. ----- COULEE CITY – Almira/Coulee-Hartline took two shortened games from Republic, 16-1 and 10-0, on Saturday. The Tigers were limited to two hits in each game. Republic (0-6 overall, 0-4 league) is at Northport (0-6, 0-4) on Saturday.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


Omak senior softball goes 3-1

The Omak 50s Senior Softball team went 3-1 at the kickoff tournament Friday and Saturday. Omak blasted N.W. Silver from Olympia, 20-2, in the opening game Saturday. “The guys scored the allowed five runs per inning each time they batted,” manager Shirley Bowden said. Hitters: Steve Marchand 3-3, double; George Webster 3-3, double, home run; Randy Mattoon 3-3; Ron Wilson 2-2, double; Mike Tews 2-2; Dale Linklater 2-2. Omak won 17-9 over No Fence Too Far from Tacoma to close out Friday. Hitters: Steve Marchand 4-4, triple; Doug Buchanan 4-4, 3 doubles; Edwin Marchand 2-4, double; Webster 2-4; Wilson 2-4, triple. The Pub crew won 22-10 over P.J.’s of Wenatchee on Saturday morning. Hitters: Steve Monahan 4-4, 2 doubles, triple; Mike Hauso 4-4, triple; Tews 3-3; Chris Harlow 3-4, 2 doubles; Steve Marchand 3-4; Edwin Marchand 3-4, double; Buchanan 3-4, home run; Jerry Louie 2-4; Wilson 2-3; Mattoon 2-3; Linklater 2-3. Lube Tube of Spokane, formerly Morris Clark, topped Omak, 21-9, to close out the tournament. Hitters: Webster 3-3; Linklater 2-2; Harlow 2-3. Tews pitched Friday and Lewis was on the mound Saturday.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


Omak FFA guns to the top

Omak came out on top of a 20-high school field to claim the state Future Farmers of America trapshoot championship Friday. This was Omak’s second state title in three years, adviser Gale Wilson said. The Top 3 members of the team combined for a score of 275 out of 300 birds, edging Freeman at 274. Omak’s Rayce Miller finished third overall out of 195 shooters with a score of 95 out of 100. Jeremy Calentine at 91 was seventh. Other Omak shooters included Cameron Daigneau (89), Clayton Hilton (85) and Ethan Pfitzer (84). Omak’s No. 2 team included Dawson Sachse (81), Tommy McNulty (80), Wyatt Wilson (75), Daniel Barrientos (54) and Cooper Routien (48). “It was a fitting way for the three seniors on the team (Calentine, Pfitzer, Miller) and myself to end a four-year successful run,” coach Wilson said. Wilson started the trapshooting team in 1997 when it was just starting out on the east side of Washington by several FFA chapters. Wilson is retiring after this school year. “I hope that the team continues on the tradition with the new FFA adviser,” he said. The coach thanked parents, community members and businesses for their support and contributions to the team, including making Omak’s March shoot the largest FFA chapter competition. “The sport teaches the shooter discipline, eye-hand coordination, judgment when to shoot and most of all (to be) a graceful winner as well as a graceful loser,” said the coach, who said members will take lessons learned into their adult lives. Omak has placed at state in each of the last six years – first twice, second twice, and third and fourth once. In other state events, Miller won the state Annie Oakley champion trophy while Barrientos was second. Miller finished fifth in the chipper competition. Wyatt Wilson was fourth in the miss-n-out. Pfitzer and Morgan O’Brien from the Tonasket club won the buddy shoot in a shootoff by hitting all 10 of the duo’s birds. Team scores: 1, Omak, 275. 2, Freeman, 274. 3-4, Colville No. 1 and Eastmont No. 1, 268. 5, Kettle Falls, 265.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..
  

April 23, 2014- Sports Briefs

<strong>Taylor, Poco zip around barrels</strong> By Al Camp The Chronicle OMAK – Tammy Taylor and her horse, Poco, won the open division of Boots and Saddles Barrel Racing Club races Sunday in the Omak Stampede Arena. The duo rounded ran the barrels in 17.932 seconds, Nathan Hennigs said. Lynn Beck on Monkey climbed through the poles to first in 25.802 seconds, edging Angela Jones at 25.967. The next competition is May 25. Barrels 7-and-younger: 1D — 1, Trent Hays, 77.933. 2D – No placings. 3D — 1, Pearl McArthur/PJ, 87.677. 2, Ashlynn Kramer/Ruby, 94.819. 3, Kayden Price/Ruby, 95.754. 4, Trinity Price/Ruby, 102.841. 8-12 year olds: 1D — 1, Brier Selvidge/BJ, 18.702. 2, Jessie Walker/Bottle Rocket, 19.306. 3, Rebecca Hawley/Fay, 19.467. 2D — 1, Braden Hennigs/Song, 19.999. 3D — 1, Jessie Walker/Big Bay, 26.402. 13-18 year olds: 1D — 1, Tiffany Manniko/Pepsi, 17.822. 2D — No placings. 3D — 1, Miranda Cleveland/Sonny, 26.375. 2, Brittany Mumford/Champ, 45.578. 3, Miranda Cleveland/Diamond, 59.265. Open 1D — 1, Tammy Taylor/Poco, 17.932. 2, Phyllis White/Cudda, 18.862. 3, Hailey Jo Henderson/Ceasar, 18.889. 2D — 1, Billie Taylor/Bobbie, 19.155. 2, Angela Jones/Niakoda, 19.495. 3D — 1, Amy Nelson/Polluck, 20.240. 2, Dione Asmussen/Magnus, 20.570. 3, Andrea Jones/Tequila, 20.958. 4, Becky Selvidge/Flash, 22.081. 5, Kellie Burton/Janie, 23.814. 6, Heather McArthur/Rowdy, 24.449. 7, Anna Blakely/Diva, 24.679. Poles 7-and-younger: 1D — 1, Trent Hays, 97.451. 8-12 year olds: 1D — 1, Jessie Walker/Bottle Rocket, 26.402. 2D — No placings. 3D — 1, Brier Selvidge/BJ, 29.746. 13-18 year olds: 1D — 1, Miranda Cleveland/Sonny, 31.223. 2D — 2, No placings. 3D — 1, Brittany Mumford/Champ, 50.878. 2, Miranda Cleveland/Diamond, 63.827. Open 1D — 1, Lynn Beck/Monkey, 25.802. 2, Angela Jones/25.967. 2D — No placings. 3D — 1, Andrea Jones/ Tequila, 27.998. 2, Becky Selvidge/Flash, 31.040. 3, Dione Asmussen/ Mando, 31.307. 4, Billie Taylor/Bobbie, 31.383. 5, Kellie Burton/Janie, 31.530. 6, Angela Jones/Batman, 32.693. 7, Michelle Skylstad/Dee, 37.300. -------------------- <strong>Staggs fires a 90</strong> The Chronicle DEER PARK – Joey Staggs of Okanogan fired a 90 Friday at the Chewelah Boys Invitational Tournament. Staggs finished tied for 22nd place in the golf tournament that drew 21 schools. “This was a course that is very similar to this year’s state championship course in Spanaway with narrow, tree-lined fairways,” Chelan coach Kirk Einspahr said. Chelan finished with a score of 348, taking second behind J.L. Crowe of Trail, B.C., at 345. Chelan starts the second half of its league matches against Omak on Thursday at the Okanogan Valley Golf Club.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


Vintage Faire is Saturday

Vendors from all over the Northwest are expected for Saturday’s fourth annual Vintage Faire. The event runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds, 175 Rodeo Trail Road. ‘ “It’s great to offer such a great venue for people’s junk fix,” said Kris Little, one of the event’s three organizers. The 50-plus vendors will offer antiques, salvaged items, jewelry, vintage goods, repurposed wares, farm junk and furniture. Booths will be in the beef barn, commercial building, the north end of the home economics building and outside. “Glampers” will offer items for glamorous, vintage-style camping. Food and beverage will be offered in the CattleWomen’s red barn and a “Blue Ribbon Bar” will be open in the grassy midway area. Beverages and an ice cream stand area also planned. Music will be provided by a brass band and a guitarist. A Vintage Faire Store will offer souvenirs, including hooded sweatshirts, beer cozies, antique replica toys, candy, canvas shopping bags and a photo booth at which people can dress up and take photos. “You could spend a whole day” at the faire shopping, eating and watching other shoppers, Little said. Last year’s faire drew around 2,300 people. “Every year we get more,” Little said. “It’s grown. It’s blown away our expectations.” “It brings in a lot more people to the fairgrounds and the community,” fairgrounds clerk Loretta Houston said. “It’s awesome. I can’t wait.” She said the faire is one of the bigger events at the fairgrounds, with several buildings and the outdoor area used. The RV area also sees increased use during the weekend. Little said some people bring wagons or wheeled wire shopping carts to haul away their purchases. Members of the Okanogan High School wrestling team will be on hand to carry larger items to vehicles in exchange for a donation to their team club. The Vintage Faire was started by five women “who love to junk” and wanted to share that love with others, Little said. Other founders are Tria Skirko, Brooke Somes, Teresa Sheeley and Kelly Buchert. Sheeley and Buchert have since bowed out of the faire. “We are just in awe that it worked,” Little said. “Now, people look forward to it.” Vendors are expected from Okanogan County and other Eastern Washington locales, and as far away as Idaho and Oregon. Shoppers come from all over the Northwest and into Canada. The organizers use a jury process to select vendors for a mix of vintage and handcrafted items. “We have pretty high standards,” Little said. Buying vintage items “can be an addiction” as shoppers hunt for specific items, great buys and things they didn’t know they needed, she said. It’s also a social event, as people greet friends they haven’t seen for awhile. “A lot will just sit and watch what other people bring out” in the way of purchases, Little said. “Some watch and giggle. Last year, one guy was out in the parking lot, tailgating, while waiting for his wife.”

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


Director brings enthusiasm to ‘Oz’

There’s a young director with a ton of enthusiasm at the helm of this year’s Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus production of “The Wizard of Oz.” Janelle Cutuli, 25, of Brewster, brings a variety of experiences to the region’s annual spring production May 2-4 and May 9-11 in the Omak Performing Arts Center, 20 S. Cedar St. “She’s got some exciting ideas for capturing the mystery and awe of Oz,” longtime organization director and set and lighting designer Judy Johnston said Monday. “Janelle has been just absolutely wonderful to work with,” stage manager Carrie Zachow said. “She’s a fresh face to the production team. It’s great to work with someone with such a passion for theater. She’s doing great.” The organization seeks directors each year, with each providing a list of plays they would like to direct. Cutuli submitted “The Wizard of Oz” and “Cinderella,” which could not be done since it’s still on Broadway. “She’s done a wonderful job,” producer Kim Harriman said. “This dovetails nicely into what she wants to do for a living.” Cutuli opted to do a play based on the movie, with characters with which she and others are familiar. There also is a 1940s play based on the book, but there are major differences. For instance, Dorothy wears silver slippers and not ruby slippers as in the movie. “I wanted to take on the challenge of creating that sense of wonder that I had seen in the movie and trying to recreate that on the stage,” said Cutuli, who also loves the show’s music. This year’s play includes a Jitterbug scene that was cut from the movie. “I think we are doing really well,” Cutuli said of practices that have gone on for several weeks. “I am really excited for everybody to see it. I think we have a really great cast.” Cutuli’s first stage opportunity came when she was 8 years old and played Sprintze, one of Tevye’s young daughters, in “Fiddler on the Roof.” She worked the set for “South Pacific” two years ago. “I got a part when I was very young, and I so loved being on the stage,” she said. “It’s quite a rush. Being in that community, being with other people that are acting and being in plays gave me a lot of excitement and enjoyment.” Cutuli, a graduate of Brewster High School, earned a bachelor’s degree in education with an endorsement in theater from Western Washington University in Bellingham. Shows are at 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


April 23, 2014- News of Record

<strong>JAIL BOOKINGS From Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office records</strong> April 20 Galdino Martinez, 23, Douglas County driving while under the influence and no valid operator’s license-without identification, and a Border Patrol hold. April 19 Maria Del Carmen Santoyo-M, 36, District Court commitment for driving while under the influence.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


April 23, 2014- Our View "Street project to boost economy"

We’ve all sat in our vehicles frustrated by road construction delays and one-way alternating traffic managed by seemingly inefficient workers. That won’t likely change anytime soon. But the outcome of road work just getting under way in Omak may be well worth the wait. State officials are starting into a project that will resurface the main thoroughfare through downtown Omak and Okanogan. In Omak, the work is being done in conjuction with a much-needed streetscaping.

April 23, 2014 midnight read more..


April 23, 2014- News Briefs

<strong>Bridgeport council meets</strong> BRIDGEPORT – The City Council will meet at 7 p.m. today at City Hall, 1206 Columbia Ave. According to a tentative agenda, the council will consider approving rates for the community swimming pool at Berryman Park as well as a contract with Armada Corp. for utility collections services. ----- <strong>Commissioners go to Pend Oreille</strong> OKANOGAN – Okanogan County commissioners plan to attend a Quad County Commission meeting at 10 a.m. Friday at the Pend Oreille County Courthouse, 625 W. Fourth St., Newport. ----- <strong>Weed board to meet tomorrow</strong> OKANOGAN – The Okanogan County Noxious Weed Board will meet at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the Grainger Administration Building, 123 N. Fifth Ave. ----- <strong>Area drug ‘take back’ events planned</strong> OMAK — Several area police agencies are participating in a prescription drug “take back” event Saturday. The Omak, Oroville and Twisp police departments and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration are giving the public an opportunity to rid their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs. Since 2010, 339 pounds of unused or expired medications have been collected in Okanogan County at take-back events and sites. Saturday’s take-back events are anonymous. Vitamins, prescription drugs, inhalers, patches, over-the-counter medications, and medicated ointments or lotions can be dropped at the Omak Police Department, 8 N. Ash St.; Oroville Police Department, 1304 Ironwood St., and Twisp Police Department, 118 S. Glover St. ----- <strong>Power outage planned for Tonasket</strong> TONASKET – A six-hour power outage is scheduled for Friday morning so Okanogan County Public Utility District crews can perform maintenance on optical fiber infrastructure. “During this time period, all traffic to Tonasket Nortons Knob, AP30035 (Double AP Wi-Fi site just north of Tonasket), and AP30036 (near Tonasket Airport), and fiber connectivity to Ellisforde Pickens Mountain will be interrupted,” the utility website said. The work is planned to last about three hours, but the outage will be from 12:01 a.m. to about 6 a.m. to deal with any unexpected issues. Another outage is planned for May 2 in Okanogan. ------ <strong>Tribe gets Reclamation security job</strong> GRAND COULEE — The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has awarded a $697,000 contract to the Colville Confederated Tribes for security and law enforcement services at Grand Coulee Dam. The tribe will provide services on Reclamation lands and facilities on the east side of the Columbia River, including the Third Powerplant, Downriver Trail and dam tour building. Services began April 1. The contract allows the tribe to assist Reclamation’s Security Response Force in emergencies and complements an existing law enforcement contract Reclamation has with the city of Grand Coulee, the Bureau said. ----- <strong>Board seeks input on school buildings</strong> TONASKET – The Tonasket School Board is seeking comments on how to proceed with a proposal to add space to all three of the district’s school buildings. In February, voters defeated a $6 million bond issue request to pay for additions to the elementary, middle and high schools, replace the alternative/outreach school building and make improvements to the sports complex. The measure needed a 60 percent yes vote, but garnered 54.4 percent. The board has not taken action to run another request in August, Superintendent Paul Turner said. ----- <strong> Trail ribbon-cutting ceremony on tap</strong> CURLEW — A ribbon-cutting ceremony is planned for 1 p.m. Saturday at the east end of the Curlew Lake trestle on the Ferry County Rail Trail. The ceremony marks completion of a trestle decking project. Ferry County Rail Trail Partners and the Ferry County Rail Corridor Committee announced the opening. “This project represents the culmination of several years of planning and effort by local, state and federal agencies and volunteers who are working together to improve the Ferry County Rail Trail,” the groups said. ----- <strong>Brewster police seek grant for new car</strong> BREWSTER – The Brewster Police Department has applied for $35,000 in federal funding, a grant and loan combination, to purchase another patrol vehicle. “This is nothing more than a plain state bid patrol vehicle without any ‘bells and whistles,’ Chief Ron Oules said. “Patrol vehicles cost that much or more to have them fully outfitted and operational. If we did not get a state bid price for the vehicle the cost would be substantially more.” He said the city hasn’t heard yet if the funding has been awarded. If it is, the city will purchase a full-size, four-door vehicle. Oules said the cheapest option is a Dodge Charger. ----- <strong>Prescribed burn to begin at Fawn Creek</strong> WINTHROP – The Methow Valley Ranger District planned to start spring prescribed burning Tuesday on 20 acres along West Fawn Creek Road. The burning treatment would last one day, according to Assistant Fire Management Officer Meg Trebon. The area had been slated for treatment last week, but plans were canceled due to unfavorable weather conditions. Other areas earmarked for treatments this spring include northwest of town near Eightmile Creek; west of Twisp near Little Bridge Creek; and west of Methow in the McFarland Creek and Squaw Creek drainages. Tonasket Ranger District has also planned prescribed burning treatments in the Mount Annie and the Lyman Lake areas, both southeast of Tonasket, as well as the Mutton area north of Conconully and the North Flank area near Havillah. ----- <strong> Conservation easement party planned</strong> RIVERSIDE – A celebration of the Scanlon Lake conservation easement is planned for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 4. The property is in the Lime Belt area. The Okanogan Land Trust event features tours of the property from 10 a.m. to noon, a lunch from noon to 1 p.m., a presentation from 12:30-1 p.m. and more tours from 1-3 p.m. The property is owned by Phil Bennett. ----- <strong> Omak man arrested for sex with teen</strong> NESPELEM – An Omak man was arrested by the Colville Tribal Police Department Thursday on suspicion of rape. Franklin G Lambert, 42, is alleged to have been in a consensual sexual relationship with a 13-year-old girl, tribal police Cmdr. Tom Holsworth said. “The case is under further investigation and will be forwarded to the FBI for their review,” he said. “Lambert could face federal charges for statutory rape as well.” ----- <strong>Snow-clearing proceeds on highway</strong> MAZAMA – At the end of last week, state Department of Transportation crews had cleared snow from North Cascades Highway past the first three avalanche chutes on Liberty Bell Mountain. By Friday crews reached milepost 163, about a half-mile below Washington Pass, according to the Department of Transportation. On the westside, snow-clearing crews reached milepost 154 about three miles from Rainy Pass. The highway is still slated for a mid-May opening. ------ <strong>Area man arrested in arson case</strong> NESPELEM – A man from the Coulee Dam-Nespelem area has been arrested for arson and attempted homicide. Mylan Williams, 35, was arrested by the Colville Tribal Police Department on April 11. He is suspected of setting fire to a house at 1131 Tilmus St., Coulee Dam, on Aug. 1, 2013, while the house was occupied, Cmdr. Tom Holsworth said. The occupant escaped unharmed.

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Two charged in meth case

Two people have been charged with dealing methamphetamine. Bridgeport resident Nichole Marie Gonzalez, 31, was charged Friday with four counts of delivery of a controlled substance and one count of possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance. Saul Morales Sandoval was charged

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Traffic projects begin

Traffic will be slowed in several locations this week as a region-wide state pavement project gets going in earnest.

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Dog park work day is Friday

Work on the city’s new off-leash dog park is under way and a work day is planned from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday at the site, next to Carl Precht Memorial RV Park in East Side Park.

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Dollar has its roots in German valley

What is it that makes you think of something decades after you have not done so? Back in the hot metal days when The Chronicle was located on North Main Street, they gave me an article to set it in type. It was about the dollar.

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Trailers allowed on Hart’s Pass

Trailer restrictions on Hart’s Pass Road have been changed to allow use by trailers equal to or less than 20 feet in length, regardless of the number of axles.

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Local hunting mishap victim recovering

By Dee Camp The Chronicle KETTLE FALLS – An Okanogan man is recovering this week after being shot by another hunter north of town in Stevens County. George Martin, 61, received several wounds to his left arm, the side of his body, neck and head after being struck by a single shotgun blast while hunting last Wednesday morning off Pingston Creek Road. He was taken to the Colville hospital and then airlifted to Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane. He was released the next day. Martin said he feels “really lucky” to escape with the wounds he did, since if he’d had his head turned more toward the other hunter, he would have been struck in the face. He said there was a turkey in the area and he moved and spooked the bird. He went looking for it and the other hunter, Stephen Myers, 56, of Greenville, Mich., shot. Stevens County Sheriff Kendle Allen said Martin and his hunting partner, Clayton Schultz of Bremerton, were on one side of a clearing and Myers and his daughter were on the other. Myers allegedly put out a turkey call, heard a response “and saw what he believed to be a turkey on the other side of the clearing,” Allen said. Myers told investigators he saw movement, shot and then hear Martin cry out. He and his daughter rushed to help Martin and called for help. The shooting occurred on state land. “He helped. He was distraught,” Martin said. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife investigated the shooting. Charges, possibly for assault, likely will be filed in Stevens County district Court, spokeswoman Madonna Luers said. Turkey hunters are not required to wear “hunter orange” clothing because the birds are extremely wary, she said. “That means you have to be sure of your target before you pull the trigger,” she said. Martin said he was hit by almost three dozen pellets, which scattered from the single shot. The pellets were left where they landed. “They tell me they’ll work their way out,” Martin said. “He had some good welts on the side of his head,” said his brother, Conconully Mayor Sam Martin. George Martin said he appreciated all the well wishes from people in the community. “Our hunt came to an end when we got onto another tom and an out-of-state hunter thought we were a turkey and shot George,” Schultz, Martin’s hunting partner, posted to Facebook. “The Department of Fish and Wildlife guys said if I had been one step closer to George, the guy may have gotten a two-fer. Funny but scary.” He added, “As hunters, we all have a responsibility to positively identify our target before pulling the trigger.” George Martin, who is retired from the Washington State Patrol, said in 32 and a half years as a trooper, he was never shot at. He said he’s an “avid turkey hunter” and plans to return to hunting. On Thursday, after arriving home from the hospital, he wrote on Facebook that he was feeling good and it was “just about time to go out turkey hunting. I still got one tag left.”

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Election about to get interesting

The election season is about to get very interesting. On Saturday night, I attended the Lincoln Day Dinner, where political newcomers and seasoned campaigners unveiled their plans to run for office this year.

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Goetz claims victory

Bryon Goetz of Okanogan won the Super Stock main at the 48th annual West Coast Street Stocks races April 13 in Yakima. Cover-age of Goetz’s huge win was in Sunday’s sports column. Some information left out included the victory paying $600, enough for a set of tires, Goetz said. The Apple Cup, which draws racers from the Northwest, is the longest continually run stock car race in the Northwest. The race also served as the inaugural race for the newly formed Tri-Track Late Model Series, which is competed at Wenatchee Valley’s Super Oval, Yakima Speedway and Hermiston’s Super Oval. There were also races in Yakima for Super Late Model (Evans finished eighth), Super Stocks and Columbia River Legends. “I plan on making all the races,” Goetz said. “I am going for the championship this year, then I am going to retire. Then I want to get my kids (ages 6 and 3) into carting.” ----- An effort to build a combination football and track facility and improve softball and baseball fields in Okanogan could become public at the next school board meeting April 30. A community group has asked to be on the agenda for the meeting, presumably for the initial presentation of a process that could lead to a bond request to pay for the improvements. Various sources tell me there is a possibility of building a football and track facility near the current softball and baseball fields behind Virginia Grainger Elementary School, 1118 S. Fifth Ave. I am all for improved facilities, and I cringe whenever a football player heads out-of-bounds on the Bulldogs’ current field, hoping they don’t hit the hard edge along the track. The only concern I’ve expressed is for parking. The school increased parking across from the gym, and it’s often full for football games, as is the regular high school lot. I also wonder about access to the area through fairly narrow, residential streets. ----- Entries are due May 7 for the Hoopin’ in the Spring basketball tournament on May 16-18 at the Nespelem Community Center, 4000 Lower Columbia River Road. There will be a men’s and a women’s open division, with up to eight players on a roster. Awards will include jackets for first place, hooded sweatshirts for second place and crewneck sweatshirts for third place. Awards will be given for most valuable player, all star and hustle. Those wishing to enter can contact Camille Pleasants at 509-633-0543. Camille and Peewee Pleasants, the Lake Roosevelt High School girls basketball coach, are also keeping busy as grandparents. Their daughter, Dominique, had a baby boy in January. Their son, Matthew, will graduate from Evergreen State College with a bachelor’s degree in June before starting fall classes for a master’s degree. He played with the semi-professional Tacoma Rise basketball team in the American Basketball Association this past season. “It was a good experience for him,” Camille Pleasants said. “I love watching him play.” ----- Not a single school mascot from our state made it to the final round of the third annual USA Today High School Sports’ Best Mascot contest. The Pateros Billygoats mascot was in the first round of voting (408 mascots nationwide), receiving six nods. The Ridgefield Spudders, one of my favorite mascots, received 29 votes. The farming community initially grew potatoes and prunes. I think we should all be glad they went with the spud mascot. The Richland Bombers, which were in the running in last year’s mascot contest, received 238 votes for their mushroom cloud and bomber logo. I did get a kick out an online typo that said much of the “petroleum” used in an atomic bomb was manufactured in the town. ----- Anna Blakley, the new president for the Boots and Saddle Barrel Racing Club, recently set a schedule. Future races include fun games and prizes May 25 and doubleheaders June 8 and 18, July 2, 16 and 30, Aug. 20 and 27, Sept. 28 and Oct. 5. The Omak arena, 421 Stampede Drive E., opens at 9:30 a.m. Sundays with time only runs at 10 a.m. and racing at noon. Wednesday races have the arena open at 5 p.m., time onlys at 5:30 p.m. and racing at 6:30 p.m. ----- There will be a benefit Indian taco feed and auctions, both silent and live, May 8 to help Wyatt Covington, Kaelyn and Krista Marchand defray the cost of attending junior high or high school rodeos. The competitors have their sights set on reaching the national finals rodeos. The junior high finals will be in Des Moines, Iowa, while the high school finals will be in Rocksprings, Wyo. The event will start at 4:30 p.m. at the Omak Community Center, 601 S. Benton St. The menu will include fry bread by Dorothy and Sue Palmer. A live auction starts at 6 p.m. An extensive auction list includes four Raptor Reef tickets, a pass for two to Silverwood and a LaserQuest family pass. ----- The Jet City Bombers roller derby team will present the third annual BomberCon on July 25-27 at The Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan. “Don’t miss out on the only roller derby training camp-out of its kind,” spokeswoman Ivana Hercha said. “You’ll receive two days of skating workshops and on and off-skates derby training from the Jet City Bombers, WFTDA Division 2 Champions. ----- The annual Two Rivers Spring Trout Derby at Lake Roosevelt has been postponed because of this year’s deep drawdown of Lake Roosevelt, organizer Dan Kieffer said. The event, which was scheduled for April 26-27, has been rescheduled for May 17-18. That’s when the reservoir’s water levels are expected to be on the rise, Kieffer said. Two Rivers Resort, which is on the Spokane Indian Reservation at the confluence of the Spokane and Columbia rivers near Fort Spokane, has also scheduled other derbies – a walleye derby June 7-8, a bass derby June 14-15 and a fall derby Aug. 23-24. ----- The Oroville Booster Club will host its 22nd annual May Day 3-on-3 Basketball Classic on May 10. There is a cost, which must be received before May 5. Divisions will include men’s and women’s open plus boys and girls high school, 14-and-under and 12-and-under. Registration forms are online at www.oroville. wednet.edu under the booster club link or call 509-560-0118 for info. ----- Bridgeport baseball player Constantino Martinez (4-1) was the state’s week 30 class 2B WIAA Player of the Week. He earned the nod with two pitching victories – against Oroville and Pateros. In 12 innings, he gave up two earned runs and 17 strikeouts. He shined at the plate, too, getting 5 hits and 7 RBI. “He is a very hard-working kid,” coach Kyle Krustangel said. “(He has) 46 strikeouts in 33 innings.” ----- Fertilizer was to have been applied Monday at the Okanogan Valley Golf Club. Irrigation for fairways was to have started Tuesday, club professional Bill Sproule said. ----- The Lake Roosevelt boys basketball team will have a Free Throw-a-thon fundraiser April 28. The event will be from 1:30-3 p.m. in the Raiders’ high school gym. ----- The city of Omak will close a portion of Ash Street and Central Avenue for the Omak Battleground 3-on-3 basketball tournament. The streets will be closed from 7 p.m. June 12 to 10 p.m. June 14. <em>Al Camp is the sports editor for The Chronicle. Email him at sports@omakchronicle.com. </em>

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Lots of fish expected for opening day

Anglers can expect to find lots of rainbows in Okanogan and Ferry counties willing to jump on their hooks during the state general fishing-opener this weekend. Anglers can compete in a derby, try a newly opened stretch of Rufus Woods Lake or dip a line in the 67 lowland lakes managed in Okanogan County (representing 18 percent of the state’s managed lakes) or the many more ice-free lakes in Ferry County. If you can’t wait until this weekend to haul in a fish, the Colville Confederated Tribes’ general fishing season is under way, having opened April 12. A tribal license is required. Later this summer, Okanogan County boots out fish in 110 alpine lakes above 4,500 feet. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife planted nearly 16.5 million trout and kokanee statewide, with 2.3 million being catchable trout and nearly 115,000 being jumbo trout that weigh up to 11 pounds apiece, and more than 50,000 triploid trout averaging 1.5 pounds each. “The lowland lakes season-opener is the biggest fishing day of the year,” said Phil Anderson, director of the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. “Lakes in every county are well-stocked, so there should be good fishing opportunities close to home.” Triploid trout planted in Okanogan County include Alta Lake (571) near Pateros, Conconully Lake (357) and Pearrygin Lake (357) near Winthrop. Millions of carry-over trout that were stocked last year and have grown to catchable size will also be available in lakes throughout the state. A thorough review of the region’s lakes, from Okanogan to Ferry counties plus the reservation, appeared in The Chronicle’s Fishrapper last week. It’s available at the newspaper office, online or from participating businesses. Those fishing the Conconully lakes can enter a derby with prizes to the Top 3 in the adult division, youth prizes and $50 for a mystery weight. There is a charge to register at the Conconully General Store, 201 N. Main St. The contest is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. A section of Rufus Woods Lake downstream of Grand Coulee Dam to the state Highway 155 bridge recently reopened for recreational fishing. The stretch has been closed since Sept. 11, 2001, for security reasons. Public access has been restored recently and the state and tribe will now permit recreational fishing. Fishing rules and license requirements in effect downstream of the bridge apply to the newly opened section.

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Road projects continue to make driving challenging

If you think driving the main drag between Omak and Okanogan has been challenging during the past year or so, just wait. We’re about to be surrounded. Road construction season is here, and the highway through Okanogan and Omak will be repaved. The project involves rebuilding sidewalk ramps to meet Americans with Disabilities Act standards, installing “bulb-outs” at several corners, grinding off the old pavement and putting down new asphalt. The utility projects we’ve endured for the past year – Omak’s sewer project and a telephone fiber installation – paved the way, so to speak, for the paving project. Pressure was on to get the utilities done before the paving project began. But wait, that’s not all. State highways all over the county will be under construction soon, with flaggers and delays expected. Paving work is planned on U.S. Highway 97 between Brewster and Okanogan and north of Tonasket, state Highway 20 over Loup Loup Pass and east of Tonasket, and on highways in the Bridgeport, Leahy Junction and Grand Coulee areas. In short, we’ll be driving over torn up roads all summer. I’m sure the windshield chip repair places and front-end alignment shops are salivating over the prospects for the coming construction season. In the end, after the state pours more than $18 million into the projects, we should have nice, smooth roads to drive on. At least until next year’s construction season begins. Dee Camp is a reporter at The Chronicle. She can be reached via email at dcamp@omakchronicle.com.

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Schools win awards

Several Okanogan County schools are among 413 statewide to win Washington Achievement Awards.

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Royalty named for 69th annual ‘49er Days

With the 69th annual ‘49er Days right around the corner, royalty has been selected and a lady and grand marshal have been announced. The 2014 Winthrop ‘49er Days junior royalty is Queen Vanessa Smith and princesses Lily Darwood and Katharine Tannehill. They are seniors at Liberty Bell High School. Ken Westman is grand marshal, and Lois McLean has been named the grand lady. They will attend the Ride to Rendezvous dinner leading in to the weekend events, May 9-11, and have seats of honor in the Saturday morning parade.

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Royalty named

With the 69th annual ‘49er Days right around the corner, royalty has been selected and a lady and grand marshal have been announced. The 2014 Winthrop ‘49er Days junior royalty is Queen Vanessa Smith and princesses Lily Darwood and Katharine Tannehill. They are seniors at Liberty Bell High School. Ken Westman is grand marshal, and Lois McLean has been named the grand lady. They will attend the Ride to Rendezvous dinner leading in to the weekend events, May 9-11, and have seats of honor in the Saturday morning parade.

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Royalty pageant reinstated

It’s been several years, but with more interested girls turning out this year the royalty pageant for the 66th annual Mansfield Play Days will make a comeback this weekend. “We’re starting it back up,” organizer and Mansfield Chamber of Commerce member Lois Heselwood said. “This year, we decided that we wanted to start bringing back the good old days.”

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April 23, 2014- Births

<strong>Coulee Medical Center</strong> Rudy Alan Esquivel, a boy, born April 10, 2014, to Jesse Esquivel and JaNae Duryea of Nespelem.

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April 23, 2014- Marriage Licenses

<strong>From Okanogan County Auditor’s Office</strong> Kelcie Grace Olynyk, 17, and Jesus Denis Sandoval, 18, both of Tonasket. Alyssa Ann Descoteaux, 19, and Kyle Allyn Snyder, 23, both of Omak. Hannah Elinore Wadland, 21, and Luis Alberto Perez, 23, both of Winthrop. Seydi Pamatz Huerta, 30, and Patrick Michael Poore Jr., 34, both of Pateros

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April 23, 2014- Community Briefs

Sunflower Festival set for May 23 OMAK — Paschal Sherman Indian School’s Sunflower Festival will be Friday, May 23. The event includes Sunflower Mass at 8:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s Mission, 3K and 5K Sun Run, with registration from 9-9:45 a.m., mini powwow grand entry at 10 a.m., royalty crowning, 3-on-3 basketball tournament with registration at 9 a.m. and games at 10 a.m., a traditional feast at 11 a.m., historic photo display, drawing, tribal Department of Fish and Wildlife fishing pond, field games and other outdoor activities, storytelling, face painting, a health fair, concessions and vendors, and tribal programs displays. During the mass, Father Jake Morton will officiate at services acknowledging first community and confirmation candidates. Habitat board gets four new members TONASKET — Several people have joined the Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity board. New members are Lorraine Derig, Betty Fry, Shelli Martinez and Larry Witt. They join Kathey and Rick Ames, Sally Campbell, Shirley Devereaux, Maggie McNett, Father Jake Morton, Pat Liley and Sydne Porter. The group recently finished building a home and is raising money for another. It plans to complete a home every other year. Fundraisers include a yard sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the old Gold Digger warehouse next to the Okanogan Estates winery gift shop, 1205 Main St.; a raffle, home and garden tour June 21, and a praise and worship concert Sept. 27. Student wins award for Spanish writing OKANOGAN — Jorge Marquez, a student at Okanogan High School, received honorable mention in the narrative, Spanish speakers category of the “Escribo en Espanol” writing contest. Awards will be given at noon May 3 at the Seattle Art Museum. Marquez, his family and Spanish teacher Carla Pruess were invited to the ceremony. The ceremony is expected to draw dignitaries from the state Legislative, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, University of Washington and the Office of the Honorary Consul of Spain in Seattle. Stonerose membership weekend begins REPUBLIC — Stonerose Interpretive Center’s membership weekend begins April 25. Members can dig for fossils that weekend, ahead of the center’s May 1 opener. A half-dozen fossils can be kept per member, interim Executive Director Katherine Meade said. Fossils may be dug from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 25-26, and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, April 27. People can join or renew their memberships that weekend. The Stonerose board’s annual meeting will be at 6 p.m. at the Northern Inn, 852 S. Clark Ave. — The Chronicle

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Prom season has arrived

Prom season gets going this weekend with several dances planned around the Okanogan-Ferry county area. Seven small schools will join for a dance from 8 p.m. to midnight at Entiat High School, 2650 Entiat Way. Participants include Pateros, Brewster, Bridgeport, Mansfield, Entiat, Manson and Waterville. The theme is “Atlantis: The Lost City.” Tickets are available ahead of time or at the door. The event is open to ninth- through 12th-graders at participating schools. Other proms include: <strong> Curlew</strong> The dance will be from 9 p.m. to midnight May 10 in the school music room with the theme “Japanese Garden.” All ninth- through 12th-graders can attend. Eighth-graders and dates from outside the district need to be signed in through the school office by May 7. Tickets are available in advance from seniors or at the door. Liberty Bell The “Masquerade Magic” prom is May 17 at Pipestone Canyon Ranch, 448 Balky Hill Road, Twisp, for freshmen through seniors. Tickets will be available in advance and at the door. Advance registration is required for guests. <strong> Okanogan</strong> Students and pre-registered guest will go “Under the Big Top” for Saturday’s prom, which will be from 8-11 p.m. in the Virginia Grainger Elementary School commons and gym. Okanogan students must have passing grades to attend. Guests must be registered by Thursday. <strong> Omak</strong> The prom, with the theme “Midnight Masquerade,” will be from 8-11:30 p.m. May 10 at 120 W. Pine St., Okanogan. Tickets are available ahead of time at the school or, for a higher cost, at the door. <strong> Oroville</strong> The prom will be from 8:30-11 p.m. May 3 for freshmen through seniors. Admission will be charged. The event will be in the high school commons, 1016 Ironwood St. The theme was not available at press time. <strong> Republic</strong> The junior-senior prom, for grades eight to 12, will be May 3. No other information was available at press time. <strong> Tonasket</strong> Saturday’s prom begins at 7 p.m. with a grand march, followed by the dance from 8 p.m. to midnight. Both are at the Community Cultural Center, 411 S. Western Ave. Community members are invited to the march, but the dance is for Tonasket High School students only. Tickets will be sold at the door. The theme is “Night on Olympus.” <strong> Inchelium, Lake Roosevelt </strong>Inchelium students attended a multi-school prom in Airway Heights in mid-March. Lake Roosevelt High School’s prom was April 12.

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April 23, 2014- Business Briefs

The Oroville Chamber of Commerce has started a new account to receive funds donated for a designated community in need, with Oso selected as the first recipient.

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Local company set to grow pot

Legally grown marijuana has arrived in North-Central Washington. Monkey Grass Farms began bringing plants in to its Wenatchee facility Monday after announcing it has received producer and processor business licenses from the state Liquor Control Board.

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Kudos to our volunteers

I have served on the Omak City Council for approximately seven years now, and the one major item that continues to astound me is our volunteers.

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Tuesday, April 22

 

Sunday, April 20



Pateros girls claim first

The Pateros High School girls track team took first in a Northeast 1B/2B League meet Tuesday. Republic’s boys were second and girls were third. Macen McLean of Mansfield won the high jump (6-6), long jump (22-02.5) and triple jump (42-9.5). The long jump broke his previous best of 21-9, which was a state track meet record last year. Pateros girls winning included Bobbi Hall in the 400 (1:08.66), Rhiannon Easter in the 1,600 (6:15.82) and Jessi Dowers in the discus (90-00). For Pateros boys, Dakota Salcido was second in the 110 hurdles (18.84), fourth in the 300 hurdles (52.01) and sixth in the long jump (18-2). Pateros is at the Rieke Invitational in Cashmere on Friday. Boys team scores: 1, Davenport 104.5. 2, Republic 84.5. 6, Lake Roosevelt 54. 7, Curlew 44. 9-tie, Mansfield and Pateros, 30. 14, Inchelium 7. Girls team scores: 1, Pateros 126. 3, Republic 79. 7, Lake Roosevelt 34. 12, Inchelium 18. 14, Curlew 12. uuuuu OKANOGAN – Mason Guerrette of Okanogan was a triple winner at a four-team meet Tuesday. Guerrette won the 100 meters (12.17), the high jump (5-6) and triple jump (38-3). Teammate Keanna Egbert won the 400 (1:09.14) and javelin (110-10). For Tonasket, Cassie Spear won the 100 (13.65) and 200 (29.47). Results for Omak and Brewster were not available. Brewster, Cascade and Cashmere are at a league meet in Omak on Tuesday. Okanogan, Chelan and Quincy are at a league meet in Tonasket on Wednesday.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


Goetz speeds to win

What do Derrike Cope, Garrett Evans, Greg Biffle and Bryon Goetz have in common? The three NASCAR drivers and Goetz each earned victories in Apple Cup races at Yakima Speedway. Goetz, 32, of Okanogan, picked up a gigantic victory April 13, winning the 48th annual West Coast Street Stocks main event and taking the points lead after one race in the series this season. “I’ve never won a race in Yakima, but I have had four seconds,” Goetz said. “It was a long time coming and luck finally came my way. Last main I won was in Wenatchee in 2009.” Goetz started seventh, but did not stay there long. He quickly passed the leaders, making moves inside and outside. “I had at least a quarter- to half-lap lead on the field,” said Goetz, who led 30 of the 40 laps. Since the race is short on the half-mile track, there are no pit stops for fuel. His father, Dave, 58, sets up the car. “It takes a lot of creative work to make a street stock car fast. There’s not as much adjustability on them,” the elder Goetz said of working on suspension, brakes, transmission and body. “I enjoy that very much, the competition to make the car for Byron to drive to win.” “We usually finish in the Top 3 in races we go to,” Dave Goetz said. “This is a big win for us.” The elder Goetz competed from 1979 to 1990 in late model cars on various tracks, including Republic. “I’m too old and slow to race now,” he said. “I would not win a race. I would just be out there going in circles.” Dave Goetz and Bryan Smith work the pits for the younger Goetz, who pilots a 1985 Camaro. The 3,100-pound, red beast puts out about 500 horsepower (uses a bored out 350-cubic-inch engine) and reaches about 106 mph on the straights. “The motor is really good,” Goetz said. “Most (of racing) is corner speed. The sooner you can get on the gas the better. Corner speed is the key to winning a race.” This was the first victory in the Camaro, which he’s run for three years. “I got a second in Yakima and a second at Spokane Raceway Park” with the Camaro, he said. Bryon Goetz, a 2000 Okanogan High School graduate, has been racing 17 years. The last five years he’s been in the 8-race series, which includes races in Wenatchee, Stateline, Idaho, Ephrata, Evergreen, Hermiston, Ore., and South Sound in Tenino. Al Camp is the sports editor at The Chronicle. Email him at sports@omakchronicle.com.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


Bulldogs take shootout with Bears

By Al Camp The Chronicle BREWSTER – Okanogan won, 4-3, over Brewster following a shootout in a Caribou Trail League soccer match Tuesday. After a scoreless first half, Okanogan broke onto the scoreboard with a goal two minutes into the second half by Justin Rivas off an assist from Fabian Rodriguez. Brewster tied the match in the 51st minute before Okanogan took the lead again on a goal by Jason Perez on an assist from Rivas. The Bears scored in the 67th and 69th minutes to lead 3-2. “We then tied it up in the 75th minute when Jason Perez scored off of an assist from Fabian Rodriguez,” Okanogan coach Dean Klepec said. Okanogan won the shootout 5-4, with scoring kicks by Rivas, Perez, Rodriguez, Arturo Ramos and Enrique Vargas. “It was a very evenly played game,” Klepec said. Scoring was not received for Brewster, which is tied with Okanogan for second place in the CTL. Quincy is in first at 7-0. Okanogan (6-2 overall, 5-2 league) is at Tonasket (5-5, 3-5) and Brewster (6-2, 5-2) is at Omak (0-9, 0-7) in league play Tuesday. uuuuu OMAK – Tonasket zipped past Omak, 6-0, in a Caribou Trail League soccer match Tuesday. “The guys played hard, but couldn’t keep with the speed,” Omak coach Chris Werner said. “I feel we played smarter soccer. We are getting better and will be playing a better game the second half of the season.” “It was a good game, we scored six goals and played well,” Tonasket coach Jack Goyette said. “They are a very young team and well coached. They played tough D and made us work hard for the goals we scored.” Brewster (6-2 overall, 5-2 league) is at Omak (0-9, 0-7) and Okanogan (6-2, 5-2) is at Tonasket (5-5, 3-5) on Tuesday.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


Peru’s children take hold

We never expected our trip to Peru to have such a hold on us so quickly. For those of you who have traveled to Third World countries, Peru was typical in its presentation: Dogs roam the streets, old people sit on corners selling whatever produce they have and rusted tin roofs cover adobe buildings that house families and businesses. The buses, called “combis” in Peru, are overcrowded, dirty and in need of repair, but still managed to keep some sort of schedule. It is all typical of abject poverty, and survival at its baseline. For 12 days, my boyfriend and I were able to explore a part of Peru that was noticeably lacking in tourists. The area is known as Cotahuasi Canyon. It is located 100 miles north-northeast of the city of Arequipa in southern Peru. It is not jungle, but high mountain desert of the Andes. The Cotahuasi River runs its length. It is considered the deepest canyon in the world, being twice as deep as the Grand Canyon. The terrain is very steep, with single-lane dirt roads. Farming is done on terraces that have ancient irrigation systems for watering. Amaranth, quinoa, potatoes and corn are grown in abundance. The scenery and the people, despite their lack of money or amenities, are welcoming. We had a guide to help us through this remote region. Marcio Ruiz is a veteran on Cotahuasi Canyon and took us to many places that, alone, I would not have been brave enough to attempt. One of these places was called Puyca (pronounced poo-ee-cah). Puyca lies at the top of a long road off the valley floor. The road up is not for the faint of heart. It literally zigzags its way up the face of the mountain, with travelers stopping to ensure they can make the switchback or tossing rocks off the road so others could pass. It’s a single lane – straight down on one side, straight up on the other. It takes about an hour and a half to scale the mountain in the combi. The village of Puyca lies on a little plateau on the top. I was so grateful to arrive safely and unload the 51 people from our little combi van. As we unloaded, we were greeted by groups of children running up and down the dirt road chasing after two bicycle tires. One tire had no rim and the other was from a broken bicycle that still had the handlebars attached to the front wheel, with the rest of the bike gone. They were, as children, having a blast rolling these down a small hill. There were no playgrounds or other toys being held or played with. We were guided to our hostel up a harrow valley, through a gate and into a courtyard. The children there were being washed off on the dirt floor in the center of the 8- foot by 10-foot “house,” using a basin – what we term as a “spit bath.” They were getting ready for school. Puyca has a school for the youngest children. It is a kindergarten that schools 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds. The older children must ride the combi up and down the mountain every day to go to school in the village of Alca. They knew I was a preschool teacher, so we were invited to view the school and interact with the children. The school houses 47 students, divided into three classrooms by age. The biggest class was the 5-year-olds. It was so hard to view this. I was dismayed that there was nothing in any of the classrooms. The 5-year-old room had two tables with a few chairs, a bulletin board with the words “bien viendo” written on it (they started school this month), and a few decorations hung from the ceiling. Some children were playing with a set of animal hats that were dirty and torn, other shared the 10 Duplo blocks. There were a few crayons, broken, in a bowl the teacher held. That was all. There were no pencils that I could see, no glue or paste, no toy center, no books and certainly no coloring area. One little boy summed up the absence of classroom tools as he clutched four markers that had no lids, and were obviously dried up. I asked, through our guide, if there were more markers. The teacher replied that there had been markers about six months ago, but they were gone. This little boy loved them so much that he refused to let them go. This brought both my boyfriend and me to tears. How could children hope for a better life when the very basics that we take for granted were missing? It was then that my boyfriend and I decided to make a difference for that boy and his classmates. Markers, crayons, maybe even a few coloring books, would be such a gift to these children, a gift we can provide. It’s not easy to get packages anywhere in this region of Peru. The postal system does not work as ours does. With the help of our guide, though, we have managed to find a way. We can send a package to the main town of Cotahuasi. The postmaster there lives in Alca and will take the package with him. From there, he will ensure it gets on the combi to Puyca, where it will be picked up by the equivalent of the mayor, who will hand deliver it to the school. I write this as an invitation for our community to become involved and make a difference to one child, if not many. New markers with the basic eight colors, boxes of large crayons with the basic eight colors, coloring books that have single pictures of animals, trucks or scenery – not Disney or movie-based books, as these kids have no idea what they are – plain paper, glue sticks and colored or plain pencils would be used to help these children learn to read and write, besides making them excited to go to school. Your donation of these items can be brought to Children’s House Montessori, 521 Jasmine St. Our school will be enclosing a letter to the children of Puyca, inviting them to become pen pals with us. Our trip to Cotahuasi, Peru, and in particular, Puyca, has our hearts forever. It touched that place that holds all children as precious and swells compassion to try to help. The need is great, but so is our ability. Marla Garr is a teacher at Children’s House Montessori in Omak. She and her boyfriend, Rick Dineen of Colville, traveled to Peru March 12-25 to hike and explore. They hired a guide, who learned she is a teacher and arranged the visit to Puyca’s school.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


Ballots due Tuesday

Special election ballots are due Tuesday for a handful of issues in Okanogan and Douglas counties. Okanogan County sent out 5,659 ballots and 2,452 were returned as of Friday afternoon. The Douglas County Auditor’s Office mailed 847 ballots, because the only two items are for Fire District No. 15 and the Bridgeport School District. As of Friday afternoon, 358 ballots had been returned. Douglas-Okanogan County Fire District No. 15 is asking voters to continue its emergency medical service levy for another six years at the same rate, 47 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. The cities of Pateros and Brewster are asking voters to approve EMS levies for the same amount, but that money will be given directly to EMS. The ballot notes that each city still has a contract for EMS services with Fire District 15 even if the measures are defeated. EMS is primarily funded through property taxes and private payments, EMS Director Tonya Vallance said. The levy “basically guarantees 24/7 coverage for the patrons in the area,” Vallance said in a previous interview. “Once the tone goes off, the taxpayer switch – for lack of a better word – kind of goes off, and the individual is paying for it then.” Okanogan and Douglas counties’ ballots also includes a request from the Bridgeport School District for a $3.9 million, 20-year bond issue to rebuild a portion of the elementary school that is comprised of portable buildings. Per property owner, the measure breaks down to about $1.84 per $1,000 of assessed value. The portables were intended to be temporary when they were installed in 1977 and have since become leaky and moldy, Superintendent Scott Sattler said. Electrical wiring and other safety issues also have become a concern, aside from the need for more space for a growing student population. Tearing down the portables would make way for 16 classrooms, a music room, computer lab, an improved playground and multi-purpose room, as well as an updated kitchen to provide breakfast and lunch for all 820 students district-wide. The entire project is estimated to cost about $8.5 million, but the state would contribute $4.6 million of that. This is the second attempt for Bridgeport to pass the bond request. Voters turned it down in the Feb. 11 special election. Although 54 percent of voters supported it, bond issues need a supermajority of more than 60 percent to pass. In the Methow Valley, voters living within the school district will decide whether to create the Methow Valley Recreation District. It would be a junior taxing district within Okanogan County, allowing it to collect a portion of property tax revenues for operations. The district’s purpose would be to not only seek funding for new recreational opportunities and projects in the Methow Valley, but help provide funding for already existing facilities such as the Wagner Memorial Pool in Twisp and the Winthrop Ice and Sports Rink. Thirteen candidates have thrown their hats in the ring to fill five commissioner seats on the recreation board, if it is created. They are Don Fitzpatrick Jr. and Julie Palm, Position No. 1; Christine Holm and Kevin Van Bueren, Position No. 2; Brent Walker, Steven Stacy and Camden Shaw, Position No. 3; Mike Fort, Bart Bradshaw and Kristin Devin, Position No. 4; and Paula Stokes, John Northcott and Julie Muyllaert, Position No. 5.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


Pot farm starts

A North-Central Washington company plans to start growing recreational marijuana in its indoor Wenatchee facility tomorrow and anticipates receiving a license soon for its outdoor operation in Omak. But by the time Monkey Grass Farms puts the finishing touches on the Omak facility, 14 Monkey Grass Road Suite A, it will be too late to start growing this season. Marijuana will start being produced there next spring, co-owner and Omak facility manager Lynette Key said. “We’ve had a lot of questions about what’s going on up here,” Key said. “Initially we wanted to do it up here in Okanogan County, and then when they (the state Liquor Control Board) cut the licenses, we knew it would be restricted. “We decided to start with the indoor because we knew it would be a perpetual crop,” she said. “As soon as we get that up and running, we’ll continue down the road here, get the surveillance system up and running.” Monkey Grass Farms is the first company in North-Central Washington to receive producer and processor business licenses from the state. In the first year, the company projects it will pay the state $1.3 million in sales tax revenues, Key said. Key is one of the company’s five owners. The others are Eric and Mary Cooper, Katie Cooper and Joni Elder, she said. “I moved here from Utah specifically to do this two years ago,” Key said. “Eric Cooper has been in the medical marijuana business in Wenatchee for 10 years. I was just kind of a little grower for him, and we teamed up.” Key said she’s a good friend of the Omak landowner, Richard “Bud” Vest, who “made us such a great deal and let us come out here.” “Without him, we wouldn’t have come this far, this fast,” she said. “He’s been super supportive of our venture and is giving us great leeway.” “I guess I’m the guinea pig. I’m willing to help anybody,” Vest said. The 88-year-old has lived in Omak since 1932. “I’ve never used it; it will not be in my house,” he said of the marijuana. “But if I’ve got a chance to lease a little land …” A longtime member of the Shriners, Vest said he plans to use the money he makes from the lease to help build a new restroom in the Spokane Shriners temple. When Key proposed the idea of a marijuana-producing business on his property, Vest said they went together to speak with his attorney and the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office to start ironing out the details. Law enforcement visited the site as well, he said. The three-acre parcel already has an 8-foot-tall wooden fence surrounding it, and the land has been graded and water lines have been installed, Key said. A 30-by-40-foot shop sits on the northeast corner of the fence, which is visible from U.S. Highway 97 north of town. Much of the crop will be covered by greenhouses and hoop houses, Key said. An estimated 3,000 plants may fit inside the area, depending on their size. In the future, another three acres adjacent to the parcel will be fenced in and readied for marijuana production. “As soon as we have the license, we’ll get it up to speed as fast as we can,” she said. “Next year, everything grown here in Omak will be sent to Wenatchee to be processed.” Harvest season for an outdoor crop will last from springtime until October. Vest’s property falls outside of Omak city limits, which relieves Monkey Grass Farms of a potential local battle to get all the necessary paperwork for its facility. The city has maintained it will not issue licenses to businesses with operations that are illegal under local, state or federal laws. Marijuana growing and use is legal in Washington, with certain restrictions, but remains illegal under federal law. “We wish Omak would reconsider their position because we feel like this is a good revenue (source),” Key said. The Wenatchee facility is located in the former Budweiser plant, 3710 Highway 97A. With a Tier 3 restricted producer license, Monkey Grass Farms will be able to grow recreational marijuana in a 21,000-square-foot canopy. Processing will be done on-site, Key said. The producer license is noted as “restricted,” because the state revised its guidelines to lower Tier 3 producing areas temporarily from 30,000 square feet to 21,000. “We’re going to produce as much as we can in that 21,000 given space,” Key said, noting that the pending license application for the Omak facility is for Tier 3 as well. “We initially planned on building all of Monkey Grass in Omak, and it just got bigger and bigger as we got started,” she said. That prompted the company to start looking into other producer-friendly locations. About 2,500 plants will be moved into the Wenatchee facility to start. From there, it takes about 90 days to cultivate the plants before they’ll be ready for processing. There are no plans just yet to hire employees, Key said. “For now, the owners, we’re just doing it ourselves until we get it up and running,” she said. As of Tuesday, 12 companies had been granted producer licenses in the Spokane area and on the west side of the Cascade Mountains. Ten companies – the majority of which received the producer licenses – also received processor licenses. No licenses have been given to retailer applicants yet. A lottery will take place in Okanogan, Douglas and Ferry counties next week, and in other counties around the state, to determine which qualified applicants will receive retail licenses to fill the limited quotas. In all three counties, the number of applicants exceeds the number of available licenses. Okanogan County has been allocated five retail licenses, one of which must be located within the city of Omak; Douglas County is allocated three licenses, one of which must be located in East Wenatchee; and one license is up for grabs in Ferry County.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


It takes a village to dye Easter eggs

It takes a lot of people to dye 80 dozen eggs. For the past eight years, the Quad City Eagles have enlisted the help of area residents of all ages to help get ready for the annual Easter egg hunt in Marina Park, 801 Jefferson Ave. It’s a big job, with hundreds of children turning out for the Saturday morning event. Volunteers prepare the hard-boiled eggs, stuff even more plastic eggs with candy and create prize baskets. This week, help came from about 15 residents at Harmony House Health Care Center, 100 River Plaza in Brewster, as well as parents, other adult volunteers and the children themselves. “They enjoy it. They look forward to it,” said Harmony House Activities Director Melody Ervin. Donning their bunny ears for the occasion, Harmony House residents made quick work of 15 dozen eggs. “I think it’s fun doing this,” resident Gwen Armbruster said as she dipped an egg into blue dye Wednesday afternoon. “I always enjoyed helping my kids color eggs. This makes us remember doing it with our kids.” Eagles member Pat Schweigert said dying eggs with the seniors every year is “just as much fun as doing it with the kids.” “To me, the most fun part is seeing them with their ears,” she said. “And they just love it, and that’s what it’s all about.” Ervin said the residents also fill plastic eggs with candy for an Easter egg hunt hosted at Harmony House for the employees’ children. “It gets them into the spirit of Easter,” Ervin said. “Of course they eat a few (pieces of candy). Why not?” “I enjoy watching them,” Ruby Field, president of the residents’ council, said of the children who visit. Thursday at the Eagles Club, 1030 Columbia Ave., there was a bigger turnout this year of children looking to ingest some sugar and paint 65 dozen eggs. “I’m making a bunch of Seahawk-colored eggs,” 5-year-old T.J. Mosier declared as he plopped two more eggs into cups of green and blue dye. Other children didn’t seem to have a particular coloring method. “I’m just colliding colors together,” said Cambria Swogger, 11, of Bridgeport. She and Estrella Toga, 11, carefully applied dye to their eggs using brushes. Toga said this was her first time coloring eggs at the Eagles. “It’s so random,” she said of her technique, swirling a brush through paint. “I’m just going with the flow.” Eagles member and egg hunt coordinator Dianne Sleeper said she thought this year’s event was a success. “The kids all had fun, they did a great job,” she said. “Thanks to all the adults who came and helped.” While children listened to high-tempo dance music, ate cookies and drank juice, they were careful to avoid the pool table where 30 prize baskets sat waiting for Saturday’s hunt. Ten baskets would go to the winners in each of three age groups: 1-3, 4-6 and 7-8. While the egg-coloring events are a fairly new tradition, the Eagles’ egg hunt has been ongoing for more than a decade, Sleeper said, noting that it usually draws families from Brewster and other towns as well. Easter egg hunts were planned in several area towns Saturday, including Pateros, Mansfield, Omak, Tonasket, Grand Coulee, Riverside, Winthrop, Conconully and Oroville. Egg hunts are planned today at 10 a.m. in Nespelem at the Colville Tribal Convalescent Center, 1 Convalescent Center Blvd., and at 1 p.m. in Republic at the Eagle Track Raceway, on Airport Road south of town.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


April 20, 2014- Sports Briefs

Lion tennis roars The Chronicle WINTHROP – The Liberty Bell boys remain unbeaten this year after taking out Oroville, 5-0, in a league match Tuesday. The Hornets girls won 5-0 over the Mountain Lions. Oroville is at Wilson Creek and Entiat at Liberty Bell on Tuesday. Boys No. 1 singles – Carlos Perez, L.B., def. Joe Sarmiento, Orov., 8-1. No. 2 singles – Josh Frye, L.B., def. Nathan Hugus, Orov., 8-1. No. 3 singles – Stoney Hulon, L.B., def. Connor Bocook, Orov., 6-1, 6-1. No. 1 doubles – Jesse Schulz/ Daniel Sonnichsen, L.B., def. Joe Sarmiento/Nathan Hugus, Orov., 6-4, 6-2. No. 2 doubles – Liberty Bell gets forfeit. Girls No. 1 singles – Lily Hilderbrand, Orov., def. Erin Frye, L.B., 6-1, 6-0. No. 2 singles – Oroville gets forfeit. No. 3 singles – Kaylee Foster, Orov., def. Carlee Wright, L.B., 0-6, 6-4 (10-8). No. 1 doubles – Angela Nelson/Ashley Marcolin, Orov., def. Emily Alexander/Sidni Butler, L.B., 6-2, 6-3. No. 2 doubles – Adrianna Sylvia/Lena Fuchs, Orov., def. Logan Butler/Gracie Grandstorm, L.B., 6-4, 6-8, 6-2. OMAK – Omak and Tonasket tennis teams split Tuesday, with the Pioneer boys prevailing 5-0 while the Tigers won the girls side 3-2. Complete results were not available. Okanogan is at Tonasket on Tuesday. Omak is at Quincy April 26. Oroville golfers medal

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


Okanogan smacks Brewster girls

Okanogan’s softball bats came alive late for an 11-1 win over Brewster in six innings of a Caribou Trail League game Tuesday. “This was a good game featuring the best two pitchers in the league in my opinion,” Okanogan coach Darin Radke said of his Makenzie Norwill and Brewster’s Markie Miller. “And for three innings, both were dealing,” Radke said. “Heck of a game for four innings,” Brewster coach Rick Miller said. Miller retired the first nine Okanogan batters in order, striking out six of them. “We hadn’t seen her velocity in a while, so we had trouble catching up to her early in the game,” Radke said. “The second and third times through the lineup we started putting the bat on the ball and getting some hits.” Brewster scored its lone run in the third inning when Stephanie Lewis hit a leadoff home run over the centerfield wall for a 1-0 Bear lead. The Bulldogs put the game away with 7 runs in the fifth, sparked by doubles hit by Cameron Moses, Jill Townsend and Sarah Gray. “We threw to a couple batters from behind in the count and left some pitches in the middle of the plate in the fifth inning,” coach Miller said. “Mix in an error here and there with a walk and suddenly they’ve put seven runs on the board.” The game ended early when Moses hit a 2-run home run in the bottom of the sixth. Norwill finished with 8 strikeouts, 1 walk and gave up 1 run on three hits. Markie Miller finished with 8 strikeouts, 4 walks and 11 runs on 8 hits. Tonasket (1-9 overall, 0-4 league) is at Okanogan (7-2, 4-0) and Brewster (4-5, 3-1) is at Omak (4-6, 2-4) for league games Tuesday. Brewster (1) – Sonneman 1-1, HBP, SAC; Carrillo 1-3; Lewis 1-1, HR, BB RBI. Okanogan (11) – Bauer 2-3, BB, 3R, RBI, SB; Moses 2-4, HR, 2B, 2R, 3 RBI; Norwill 1-3, R, SB; Morris 1-2, R, BB; Townsend 1-3, 2B, R, 2RBI, SB; Oules BB, R, SB; Gray 2-3, 2B, R, RBI; Bryson BB, R. OMAK – Omak blasted Tonasket, 20-5, in five innings of a Caribou Trail League softball game Tuesday. Omak led 5-4 into the bottom of the second inning before pushing across 10 runs. Omak’s Madison Reed knocked out her first varsity home run. Brewster (4-5 overall, 3-1 league) is at Omak (4-6, 2-4) and Tonasket (1-9, 0-4) goes to Okanogan (7-2, 4-0) for league games Tuesday. Omak (20) – Ken. Duck 3BB, 3R; Zacherle 2-4; Keaton 2-3, 2B; N. Boyd 2-3, 3R, 2RBI; Reed 1-2, HR; Jackson 2BB, 2R; Kod. Duck 2-3, 2R. Tonasket (5) – Wahl 1-2; Frazier 1-3; Pershing 2-4, 2B; Cosino 2BB, 2R. REPUBLIC – Curlew took out Republic, 14-2, in a five inning, Northeast 1B League softball game Tuesday. Curlew’s Chyenne Snow had a double and triple.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..


No. 1 Brewster falls in baseball

By Al Camp The Chronicle BREWSTER – Clay Ashworth came within a triple of hitting for the cycle to lead Okanogan past No. 1 state-ranked Brewster, 9-6, in a Caribou Trail League baseball game Tuesday. Ashworth and Cody Sumner each had their first home runs of the season. “Tough first loss of the season,” Brewster coach Todd Phillips said. “This loss is on me. I didn’t get the boys mentally prepared to play this game. We came out a little tight and put ourselves in a hole early. We just couldn’t find our way out of it.” Jim Townsend doubled and Sumner homered to help give Okanogan a 3-0 lead early. The Bulldogs added another run in the third with Ashworth’s homer and two more in the fourth off three straight hits by Dakota Fingar, Tyler Wood and Clay Ashworth. Brewster cracked the scoreboard in the bottom of the fourth when Raul Olvera, on with a fielder’s choice, scored on a single by Chris Varelas. Brewster closed to 8-6 with four runs with two outs in the bottom of the sixth. Okanogan threw three pitchers at Brewster – Townsend (3I, 4K, 2BB, 1H), Jacob Lawson (3I, 4K, 1BB, 2ER, 7H) and Clay Ashworth (1I, 2K). “The best play of the day came from one of our starting freshmen,” Okanogan coach Ed Ashworth said. “Greyson Fields dove head first for a pop fly behind the plate and into the fence. Greyson is our tough kid who just works.” Brewster pitchers were Olvera (5I, 6K, 2BB, 4ER, 10H) and Adrian Urias (2I, 1K, 5BB, 2ER, 1H). Okanogan (5-3 overall, 2-2 league) is at Tonasket (6-3, 2-2) and Brewster (8-1, 3-1) is at Omak (1-7, 0-4) on Tuesday. Okanogan (9) – Fingar 1-4, R, BB; Wood 1-3, 3B, 2R, 2RBI, BB; Ashworth 3-4, 2B, HR, 2R, 2RBI, BB, 2SB; Townsend 2-5, R, 2RBI; Sumner 1-4, HR, R, 2RBI; Cate 2BB, R; Fields 1-2, R, 2BB; Super 2-4, 2B, RBI. Brewster (6) – Boesel BB, 2R, 2SB; Taylor 2-4, R, 2SB; Driessen 1-3, R, 2RBI, BB, SB; Urias 2-4; Bayha 1-3, 2B, RBI; Olvera R, SB; Varelas 1-4, RBI, SB; Garcia 1-3, R, BB, SB. COULEE DAM – Lake Roosevelt blanked Bridgeport, 10-0, in six innings of a North-Central Washington 2B League baseball game Tuesday. Devan Black got a complete game win. Lake Roosevelt (5-3 overall, 4-1 league) is at league-leading Liberty Bell (6-2, 4-0) and Pateros (4-1, 3-1) is at Bridgeport (5-6, 4-1) on Tuesday. OROVILLE – Liberty Bell beat Oroville, 9-1, in a league baseball game Tuesday. Manson (1-9 overall, 1-6 league) is at Oroville (1-10, 1-6) and Lake Roosevelt (5-3, 4-1) is at Liberty Bell (6-2, 4-0) in league games Tuesday. OMAK – Tonasket slipped past Omak, 7-4, in a Caribou Trail League game Tuesday. Okanogan (5-3 overall, 2-2 league) is at Tonasket (6-3, 2-2) and Brewster (8-1, 3-1) is at Omak (1-7, 0-4) in league games Tuesday. MANSON – Pateros clobbered Manson, 19-4, on Tuesday. Pateros (4-1 overall, 3-1 league) is at Bridgeport (5-6, 4-1) on Tuesday. REPUBLIC – Republic swept Curlew, 2-1 and 7-3, in a Northeast B League doubleheader Tuesday. Aaron Fritts, who relieved Garrett Weller (7I, 2H, 1R, 6K, 1BB, 0ER), pitched the final inning for the win.

April 20, 2014 midnight read more..

Thursday, April 17



Spring burning delayed by unfavorable weather

Unfavorable weather conditions have postponed spring prescribed burning today in the Methow Valley Ranger District. The district had planned to do some under-burning on about 20 acres in the Fawn Creek area about 10 miles west of town.

April 17, 2014 3:03 p.m. read more..
 

Engine No. 1 hits the road for centennial

The Omak Fire Department’s engine No. 1 hit the road Thursday morning for a drive from the Okanogan Fire Hall Museum to Omak for the department’s centennial celebration on Saturday.

April 17, 2014 2:57 p.m. read more..
 

Wednesday, April 16

    

(2014-179 April 2, 9, 16 & 23) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING THROUGH THE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE OR SUCCESSOR AGENCY, UNITED STAT

(2014-174 April 2, 9, 16 & 23) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING THROUGH THE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE OR SUCCESSOR AGENCY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, its successor in interest and/or assigns,

April 16, 2014 8:18 a.m. read more..
           

Bivins charged in ATV death

An Omak man was officially charged last week with one count of vehicular homicide for the death two days earlier of his ATV passenger.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..
 

April 16, 2014- News Briefs

Hospital committee plans first meeting OKANOGAN – The first joint hospital committee meeting is scheduled for 3-5 p.m. April 30 in the Okanogan County commissioners’ hearing room at the Grainger administration building, 123 N. Fifth Ave.

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Fire prompts road closure

PINE CREEK — A wildlife raced through an aspen grove Monday afternoon, weakening trees and prompting officials to close North Pine Creek Road.

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Tonasket Food Bank needs help

Once more, the Tonasket Food Bank may have to find a new home. Our board of directors are faced with a choice of finding another location or purchasing the building currently used.

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Agency should reopen gated road

Public lands are supposed to be just that — open for public recreation and activities. So I’m sometimes left incredulous when state or federal officials move to restrict public activities on the land — and roads — owned by taxpayers.

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Cattlemen oppose fish project

The first phase of a proposed fish barrier passage project along Johnson Creek will not begin construction in June as planned, but some residents are objecting to the project.

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April 16, 2014- Business Briefs

<strong>Stonerose names interim director</strong> REPUBLIC — Katherine Meade, a longtime Ferry County resident and business owner, has been named interim executive director of Stonerose Interpretive Center.

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Bank hires new vice president

Josh Stendera has joined North Cascades Bank as senior vice president and chief credit officer. He is based at the bank’s Wenatchee branch at 614 Mission St.

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Churches celebrate Easter with services

OKANOGAN – Several area churches are joining Sunday morning for an interdenominational “Sonrise Service” at the Omak Memorial Cemetery, 2547 Elmway. The Christians in Action service runs from 6:30-7 a.m. and the Rev. Marc Doney of River of Life Foursquare Church is leading the service. He is a former U.S. Marine, deputy sheriff and associate pastor.

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Community egg hunts offer candy and prizes

An egg hunt and picnic will get rolling at noon Saturday at Pearrygin Lake State Park, 561 Bear Creek Road. A Discover Pass is not needed, since Saturday is a Washington State Parks free admission day. The free hunt, organized by the Twisp Valley Grange, will feature the egg hunt for children, followed by a free barbecue provided by Ulrich Drug. The Winthrop Kiwanis Club will offer photos with the Easter bunny. Hunters are asked to bring a basket for eggs and a blanket for the picnic. Other egg hunts in the area include: Bridgeport — The Quad City Eagles is planning its annual Easter egg hunt for 10 a.m. Saturday in Marina Park, 801 Jefferson Ave. Prizes for the hunt will be given to winners in three age groups: 1-3, 4-6 and 7-8, organizer Dianne Sleeper said. Area children are invited to help dye the eggs at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Eagles, 1030 Columbia Ave. Refreshments will be served. Parents and other community members are invited to the Eagles at 6 p.m. Tuesday to make the prize baskets and children’s’ snacks – popcorn ball Easter bunnies. Residents at Harmony House Health Care Center in Brewster will also dye some eggs for the event, Sleeper said. There could be at least 30-45 dozen eggs, including plastic ones filled with candy. Conconully — the Ladybugs fire auxiliary and Conconully Volunteer Fire Department will offer a hunt at 1 p.m. Saturday in Conconully State Park for youngsters through pre-teen age. The free hunt will be in the day area west of the main entrance, and will include plastic eggs filled with candy, coins, trinkets and tickets entitling finders to special holiday toys. One certificate for an Easter basket will be in each age area. A Discover Pass is not needed. All youngsters will receive holiday chocolate candy and fire safety information. Grand Coulee – An Easter parade will be at 10 a.m. in downtown Grand Coulee. Prizes will be given for best Easter outfit, bonnet and costume. Pets should be on leashes. The Grand Coulee Dam Lions Club will host an Easter egg hunt at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Grand Coulee Dam Middle School athletic field, 412 Federal Ave. Mansfield — The Mansfield Lions Club will host an Easter egg hunt at 10 a.m. Saturday at Bluestem Park, following a pancake feed from 8-9:30 a.m. in front of the fire station, 138 Main St. Children will be able to have photos taken with the Easter bunny. Nespelem – A children’s egg hunt will be at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Colville Tribal Convalescent Center, 1 Convalescent Center Blvd. Special eggs will bring their finders Easter baskets. Omak — 10 a.m. Saturday in Civic League Park next to the Omak Public Library, 30 S. Ash St. Children up to third-grade can search for eggs. Four age categories will be offered. More than 2,000 candy- and prize-filled eggs will be offered. “Don’t be late,” the organizing Omak-Okanogan Civic League and Omak Masons said. “The event starts promptly at 10 a.m. with the ringing of the church bells” next door to the park. Oroville – An egg hunt is planned at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Veranda Beach, 299 Eastlake Road. The Easter Bunny will be there. Pateros — An Easter egg hunt will be at 10 a.m. Saturday outside Rivers Restaurant and the neighboring Lakeshore Inn on Lakeshore Drive. “Parents, don’t let your kids be late. It’s a fast, fast three minutes,” restaurant Manager Theresa Blackburn said. About 1,500 plastic eggs will be dispersed in three different areas for three different age groups: 0-6, 7-9 and 10-12, Blackburn said. The eggs will be filled with candy as well as small gift certificates and possibly other goodies. Prize baskets will be awarded to the winner from each age group. Republic – An egg hunt will be at 1 p.m. Sunday at Eagle Track Raceway on Airport Road south of town. Riverside – The Lighthouse Assembly of God Church is organizing an egg hunt at 11 a.m. Saturday in the city park next to the Riverside Grocery, 102 N. Main St. Prizes and free hot dogs will be offered. The hunt is for children up to age 12.

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Rumbolz remembered with range of emotions

“I ain’t here for a long time. I’m here for a good time.” The strains of George Strait’s “Here for a Good Time” and other songs filled Dawson Gym on Saturday as the life of 24-year-old Charity Rumbolz was remembered. A crowd nearly as large as those for graduation filled Okanogan High School’s gym as friends, family, co-workers, teachers and others were taken through a range of emotions from tears to laughter. The memorial also served as a reunion of sorts for many members of her 2007 graduating class, who greeted each other with hugs, tears and smiles. Rumbolz died April 5 when the ATV in which she was a passenger went off Sinlahekin Road and into Conconully Lake. The driver, 33-year-old Cain Bivins, was thrown clear of the vehicle. “We’re here to pay respect and to show love to her family and each other,” the Rev. Brian Bowes said. “She had a rich zest for living.” Bowes asked the mourners to close their eyes and imagine a calm lake and a sun-warmed stone in their hands. Then he asked them to imagine casting the stone into the lake and watching the ripples radiate outward. The stone represented Rumbolz and the ripples represented the impact she had on people. Bowes recalled Rumbolz as a child attending his church camp and said, “God doesn’t cause bad things to happen. He grieves with us.” He read a letter from Rumbolz’s father, Rod Rumbolz, remembering his daughter, who had worked with him for the past two years. “I was so proud of her,” the letter said. “I will miss my little helper.” He also asked the mourners to be with Bivins and his family. “He’ll need all of us,” Bowes said, reading the letter. The Rumbolz and Bivins families were seated together at the service. Charity Rumbolz’s aunt spoke briefly, and then the audience viewed a slide show of pictures from Rumbolz’s life. The photos showed a girl and then a young woman laughing, making goofy faces and enjoying the company of friends and family. Small ripples of laughter broke out at certain photos. Bowes ended the service with a quote from Rose Kennedy: “It has been said, ‘Time heals all wounds.’ I do not agree. The wounds remain. In time, the mind, protecting its sanity, covers them with scar tissue and the pain lessens. But it is never gone.” “Remember the life and the love and the legacy of Charity Rumbolz,” he said. After the service, mourners released hundreds of balloons outside, standing in silence and watching them carried off on a south wind into a cloud-strewn blue sky.

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Kindergarten signups begin

By Dee Camp The Chronicle OKANOGAN — Kindergarten registration is under way in districts across Okanogan and Ferry counties. In all districts, children need to be 5 years old by Sept. 1. A birth certificate, Social Security number and immunization records are needed. Schools say registration is important so they can plan staffing and other aspects of the program for next year. The Chronicle contacted all districts in the area; some did not reply by deadline. Those that provided information include: Brewster — Registration will be from 4-7 p.m. May 15 at the school, 503 S. Seventh St. Students need to attend, since teachers will be conducting entry evaluations. Curlew – Parents can register children at any time; most wait until August. Grand Coulee Dam — Registration ended April 11 at Center Elementary, but screening will be Thursday and Friday. Youngsters will be screened in vision, hearing and communication. Screening is by appointment at 509-633-0730. Kindergarten visit days will be from 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. May 6-7 for registered children. “Your child will have the opportunity to experience classroom activities, recess and lunch,” the school said. Lunch will be available for a fee. Parents are asked to contact the school office by 9 a.m. to make lunch arrangements. Inchelium – Registration won’t be until August. Keller – “Transition day” is May 15 for Head Start and other children, who will visit the school that day. Registration is during the summer. Methow Valley – A roundup with classroom visits was in early March, but children can be registered any time. Nespelem – A special registration day usually isn’t planned. The school works with the local Head Start program for students moving from one level to the next. Okanogan — Registration will be from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. April 21-25. Spanish interpreters will be available. Parents will get packets with information about the program, child development and readiness. Staff members will answer questions about classes, and student services and busing will be available. Screening will be offered for children with developmental delays. Registration will continue, by appointment, until May 9 by calling the school, 509-422-3580. Omak — Registration will be the first week of May at North Omak Elementary School, 615 Oak St. Preschool roundup will be from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. April 28-29. Free screenings can be scheduled by calling 509-826-2380. Orient – Kindergarten roundup will be at 3 p.m. May 1 in the school arts room, 274 Fourth Ave. Parents and children can learn about the program. Oroville – Registration will be from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. today and tomorrow at the elementary school, 808 Main St. The school asks that parents make appointments by calling 509-476-3332. Paschal Sherman Indian School – Children can be registered any time at the school, 25 Mission Road, Omak. Pateros — Registration and screening will be from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. May 1 in the school gym, 344 W. Beach St. Appointments are requested by calling 509-923-2343 Ext. 2. Child Find screening for those from birth to age 21 will be the same day. Republic – Registration will be during school hours April 22-23 in the elementary office, 30306 E. state Highway 20. Tonasket – A kindergarten information night for English speakers was at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, with registration from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at the school, 35 state Highway 20. Information for Spanish speakers will be presented at 6:30 tonight, with registration from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday. Those who miss the registration times can contact the school office, 509-486-4933, to sign up their children. Bridgeport already did its kindergarten registration. It drew 60 youngsters, elementary Principal Shelby Robins said.

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Student raises money for overseas school

By Jennifer Marshall The Chronicle MANSFIELD – A ninth-grader is enlisting the help of her fellow Mansfield High School students to raise money for a new one-room schoolhouse in a disadvantaged country. “I think it’s sad that there’s a bunch of kids who don’t get to go to school… and I just wanted to help them so they get the opportunity we get,” Samantha Conrad said. Conrad, 15, said she was inspired after attending We Day in Seattle last month. She and 16 other Mansfield students heard presentations from several celebrities, including Martin Luther King III, actor Edward Norton, rapper Flo Rida, Seattle Seahawks players Russell Wilson, Derrick Coleman, Bobby Wagner and Jermaine Kearse, and more. The event was hosted by Free the Children, an international charity that encourages youth to take an active role in their communities. “The main point is it’s not just about you, it’s about everybody,” said teacher Jessica Schultz, who accompanied the students on their trip. Conrad said the message she took from We Day was “that not everybody has the opportunities that we get and we should be more open to help people.” The basis of Conrad’s idea was a program called We Create Change, one of several service-oriented programs Free the Children organizes. In We Create Change, youth are tasked with raising $20 worth of change to purchase one brick to help build a school. Conrad’s goal is to raise at least $1,000, she said. To that end, she has placed fliers and piggy banks around the school and hopes to start gathering donations from the community soon. “I even got my little sister involved in it and everything,” she said. Shaylyn Book, a second-grader, has talked to her classmates about the fundraiser and “took all this money she was saving for a toy she really wanted and put it in the piggy banks,” Conrad said. As of last Thursday, about $50 to $60 had been raised. Donations are funneled through a special fund in the Associated Student Body, and Schultz said they’re still working on the legalities of accepting community donations. The schoolhouse to which Mansfield contributes could be built in one of several areas, such as Ecuador, India, Africa or Asia, Schultz said. Taking the effort a step further, she said she’d like to help build the schoolhouse and plans to raise money as well for that. Schultz said the cost for a three-week trip could be about $4,000. Conrad is also spearheading a food drive. As of last week, students had chipped in about three boxes of non-perishable food that will go to the Chelan-Douglas Community Action Council. The food drive ends Saturday.

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Anti-texting ‘crash’ planned

First responders will join with the Tonasket School District and North Valley Hospital in an anti-texting exercise later this month. The April 29 “Don’t Text and Drive” exercise involves a simulated head-on crash between a school bus and a car, Glenda Beauregard of Okanogan County Emergency Management said. Agencies involved include the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office, Washington State Patrol, Tonasket Police Department, Tonasket Fire District/Fire District No. 4, Aeneas Valley Fire District No. 16, Tonasket and Oroville emergency medical services, state Department of Emergency Management and the county 911 dispatch center. Beauregard said the scene will be in the Colony Self Storage parking lot. Students will simulate being the victims and will be taken to North Valley Hospital by ambulance. At the same time, the school district will be notified and will conduct family notification and reunification.

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April 16, 2014- Community Briefs

League gets out of parade organizing OMAK — The Omak-Okanogan Civic League is getting out of the parade organization business. The group has organized the Omak Stampede children’s parade for many years, but said it no longer has the membership to organize it. It suggested individuals or groups that would like to take over the event contact the Stampede office, or the event would be moved from Saturday to Sunday and included with the grand parade. Stampede Office Manager Sarah Grooms said potential parade organizers should contact the Civic League, since the Stampede does not organize either parade. The Omak Chamber of Commerce stages the grand parade. GOP Lincoln Day dinner is Saturday PATEROS — The Republican Party Lincoln Day Dinner and auction will be at 6 p.m. Saturday in the Central Building, 233 Lakeshore Drive. Freedom Foundation CEO Tom McCabe is the guest speaker. A social hour will be at 5 p.m., with the prime rib dinner to follow. Ticket information is available at 509-422-9749. — The Chronicle

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Tribe celebrates Earth Day event

<em> NESPELEM —</em> An Earth Day celebration will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday at the celebration grounds next to the Community Center, 4000 Lower Columbia River Road. The Colville tribal event includes food, performances by children and drummers, informational booths and drawings for a variety of prizes. A color guard will present flags at 10 a.m., followed by a prayer from a tribal elder. At 10:45 a.m., performances are planned by local school children and drummers. Winners of school and tribal programs competitions will be announced at 11 a.m. A barbecue featuring hot dogs, beverages and dessert is planned. Door prizes will be announced at 1 p.m. Winners must be present. A closing ceremony will be at 1:30 p.m. Participants can visit more than 50 booths for information and free items. Information will be available on recycling, cleaning up, energy conservation, reducing air pollution, and education and sharing. The celebration is provided by the tribal recycling and environmental trust programs. Tribal recycling accepts, newspapers, white or colored paper, paper sacks, magazines, inserts and junk mail, bagged shredded paper, telephone and paperback books, flattened cardboard boxes, chipboard (food, detergent and facial tissue boxes, and paper towel and toilet paper tubes), clean plastic bottles (No. 1 and No. 2, no lids), aluminum cans and pie pans, clean steel/tin cans, empty aerosol cans, and clean glass food and beverage jars and bottles (sorted by color). ----------------------------------------- <strong>Cities plan Arbor Day activities</strong> <em>OKANOGAN —</em> Several Okanogan County communities are planning Arbor Day celebrations in the next couple weeks. Okanogan and Omak, which share a Tree Board, will have their Arbor Day events Friday. In Okanogan, a tree-planting ceremony begins at 11 a.m. in Jaycee Park. A linden tree will be planted. At 1 p.m., a dogwood tree will be planted in the dog park being developed in East Side Park. The dog park is adjacent to Carl Precht Memorial RV Park. Other Arbor Day celebrations include: Oroville — 1:30 p.m. April 24 at Oroville Elementary School, 808 Main St. Two trees are scheduled to be planted. Pateros — 10 a.m. April 26 on the pedestrian mall. A tree will be planted. Twisp — Noon to 1 p.m. April 26 on Glover Street. Park trees will be pruned and a tree will be planted. Coulee Dam had a tree planting April 9 in Mason Park. The state’s official Arbor Day was April 9. The Department of Natural Resources recognized 84 cities in the Tree City USA program. Local honorees included Okanogan, 17; Omak, 17; Oroville, 6; Pateros, 1; Tonasket, 8; and Twisp, 14.

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April 16, 2014- Marriage Licenses

<strong>From Okanogan County Auditor’s Office</strong> Ruth Emiley Friedlander, 41, and Monte Lewis Marchand Sr., 44, both of Nespelem. Otilia Pena Lopez, 36, of Oroville, and Alex A. Sanchez, 38, of Okanogan. <em>—The Chronicle</em>

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April 16, 2014- Births

<strong>Three Rivers Hospital</strong> Talon Thomas Lovette, a boy, born April 4, 2014, to Tom and Callie Lovette of Twisp.

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Kraske speeds in 400

Rachael Kraske of Omak appears to be on course to reach the national track and field champ-ionship later this summer after setting a stadium record in the 400-meter hurdles Saturday in Forest Grove, Ore. Kraske, who competes for George Fox University in Newberg, Ore., won the hurdles in one minute, 1.83 seconds, breaking the Pacific University stadium record of 1:01.88 set in 2009. Her time improved her to top standing in the conference and third-place standing on the all-time Bruin list and moved into second in the nation. Her time was .08 second faster than her previous best, 1:01.96 that qualified her for nationals last year. Kraske also won the 100-meters (12.38; PR), improving her conference-leading time and fifth-place standing at George Fox while moving into 21st in D-III. In the 200 meter dash, she placed second with a 25.82, but already leads the NWC and is seventh nationally with a previous 25.60. uuuuu The American Bulldog, Okanogan’s Lee Morrison, lost to Marat Gafurove of Russia in a feather-weight (145 pounds) championship mixed martial arts fight April 4 in Orenburg, Russia. Morrison (13-4-0) lost a five-round decision to Gafurove (9-0-0) in a M-1 Global Championship main event of a mixed martial arts battle. Morrison has won four of his bouts by knockout and four by submission. Gafurove of Dagestan, Russia, defended his title for the second time. He’s had one knockout and five submissions. He is a jiu-jitsu specialist, who originally captured the crown in 2013. After a couple of years trying to make a step up to the next level, 2013 was finally the year that featherweight Lee “American Bulldog” Morrison made that transition. “It went really well with two wins over two great opponents,” said Morrison in an M-1 online article. “One was Julian Erosa in CageSport and the other was Mikail Malyutin over in M-1 Global for my debut. Both are big wins and I’m glad to have them behind me and my confidence high for the next one.” uuuuu Matt Koenigs, the director of athletics and head coach for cross country/track and field at Trinity Lutheran College in Everett, sent an email Monday about his move there. Plus, Trinity was accepted Sunday for membership to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). “It’s an exciting time for us at Trinity,” said Koenigs. “We draw quite a few student-athletes from your area.” See Sidelines B10

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Kodiaks defeat fifth-ranked Bulldogs

Cascade twice found ways to push across the winning run in the bottom of the seventh inning to sweep a baseball twin bill from Okanogan, 4-3 and 9-8, on Saturday. Okanogan, which entered the Caribou Trail League matchup ranked No. 5 in the state, did a lot right, coach Ed Ashworth said. In the opener, Jim Townsend gave up 2 unearned runs on 6 hits while striking out 5 and walking 1. Clay Ashworth closed the final inning and one-third, striking out two, walking one and giving up no earned runs and 2 hits. “We made some mistakes that allowed Cascade to run the base paths,” Ashworth said. “But our four errors and their eight hits helped provide the Kodiaks with the win.” Dakota Fingar chased down a fly ball for a catch over his left shoulder while the bases were loaded and two outs. “(He) made the best high school baseball catch I’ve ever seen in center field,” the coach said. “The team played their guts out and kept grinding the whole game.” Okanogan (3) – Ashworth 1-3, 2RBI, HBP; Townsend 2-3, 2B, HBP; Fields RBI; Cate 1-3; Lawson 1-2, SAC. “Game two was more exciting than the first,” coach Ashworth said. Okanogan went up 3-0 in the top of the third, only to be matched by 3 runs by Cascade in the bottom of the inning. The Bulldogs trailed 6-4 after four innings before putting up a 3-spot in the top of the fifth for a 7-6 lead. Okanogan pushed across one more run in the top of the seventh only to watch Cascade win the game by scoring 3 runs with two outs in the bottom of the seventh. “A walk, a hit batter and a well-placed hit by Cascade gave them another win,” the coach said. “It came down to whoever had the last at-bat would most likely win. And, unfortunately for us, we were on the road.” Okanogan out hit Cascade 13-8. Clay Ashworth pitched the first three innings, giving up 3 earned runs on 4 hits while striking out 2 and walking 2.

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Cashmere gets past Omak; Okanogan boys win

Cashmere nipped Omak in 1A high school tennis, 3-2, in both boys and girls matches Saturday. “The Pioneers fought hard against Cashmere today, but both the boys and girls teams came up a little short in the team score against the visiting Bulldogs,” Omak coach Lance O’Dell said. Omak won both girls and boys doubles matches, while Cashmere won all the singles competitions. On the boys side, state veterans Morgan O’Dell and Gabe Holz won No. 1 doubles (6-0, 6-0) and Brady Layton and Caleb Riggle took No. 2 doubles (6-0, 6-0). The boys title swung on a tough No. 3 singles match, where Cashmere’s Cameron Moser edged Cody Smith, 6-4, 3-6 and 6-2. Cashmere’s Mikaela Sites slipped past Omak’s Hannah Love, 6-4, 6-7 (3-7) and 6-1 in a deciding match at No. 3 singles. Quincy is at Omak on Thursday before the Pioneers go to Chelan on Saturday. Boys No. 1 singles – Chad Raven, Cashmere, def. Devyn Grillo, Omak, 6-0, 6-1. No. 2 singles – Alexander Robertson, Cashmere, def. Matt Pearce, Omak, 6-4, 6-3. No. 3 singles – Cameron Moser, Cashmere, def. Cody Smith, Omak, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2. No. 1 doubles – Morgan O’Dell/Gabe Holz, Omak, def. Blake Badgley/Trey Michael, Cashmere, 6-0, 6-0. No. 2 doubles – Brady Layton/Caleb Riggle, Omak, def. Armando Estrada/Ian Lindell, Cashmere, 6-0, 6-0. Girls No. 1 singles – Tasha Kowatsch, Cashmere, def. Mady Sandoval, Omak, 6-0, 6-0. No. 2 singles – Sammy O’Bryan, Cashmere, def. Rocio Cruz, Omak, 6-3, 6-2. No. 3 singles – Mikaela Sites, Cashmere, def. Hannah Love, Omak, 6-4, 6-7 (3-7), 6-1. No. 1 doubles – Danielle Berntsen/Alex O’Dell, Omak, def. Megan Reinhart/Dani Kenoyer, Cashmere, 6-0, 6-1. No. 2 doubles – Anelise Goodall/Daniela Carroll, Omak, def. Aidan Darlington/Stephanie Preheim, Cashmere, 7-5, 6-0. <strong>LEAVENWORTH –</strong> Okanogan High School’s boys tennis team picked up its first win of the season Saturday, 3-2, over Cascade. Nathan Linklater and Blake Chesledon teamed for the first time this season for doubles and won 6-0, 6-1. The deciding match was No. 3 singles, where Jose Alvarez in his first singles match prevailed 4-6, 6-0 and 6-1, coach Jeff Cheeseman said. Cascade won the girls side, 3-2. Megan Patrick won at No. 1 singles, 7-6 (7-5) and 6-3. Luisa Cardenas took No. 3 singles 6-2 and 6-1. Liberty Bell is at Okanogan on Thursday. Quincy is at Okanogan on Saturday. <strong>TONASKET –</strong> Chelan won by identical 4-1 scores in boys and girls tennis at Tonasket in a rescheduled match Friday. “Best Tonasket weather we’ve ever played in,” Chelan coach Marty Rothlisberger said. “Madi (Villalva) played one of her best matches of the season and continues to get better,” Tonasket coach Mark Millner said of his girls No. 1 player. “She’s worked hard and it’s nice to see her get a win in this league where girls singles is very competitive.” Tonasket is at Cashmere on Thursday. Girls No. 1 singles – Madi Villalva, Ton., def. Allie Schwantes, Chelan, 6-4, 6-4. No. 2 singles – Sarah Kunkel, Chelan, def. Jenny Bello, Ton., 6-2, 6-2. No. 3 singles – Abby Phelps, Chelan, Def. Abby Gschiel, Ton., 6-0, 6-1. No. 1 doubles – Megan Robinson/Shelby Dietrich, Chelan, def. Brisa Leep/Bailee Hirst, Ton., 6-0, 6-0. No. 2 doubles – Kaylee Kronbauer/Vanessa Miller, Chelan, def. Norma Ramos/Anna St. Martin, Ton., 6-0, 6-0. Boys No. 1 singles – Eli Jenkins, Chelan, def. Brian Hendrick, Ton., 7-5, 6-1. No. 2 singles – Trevor Terris, Ton., def. Bon Malana, Chelan, 6-3, 6-4. No. 3 singles – Bryce Robison, Chelan, def. Walker Marks, Ton., 6-1, 6-4. No. 1 doubles – Tanner Hendricks/Matt Barnes, Chelan, def. Colton Leep/ Morgan O’Bryan, Ton., 6-3, 6-4. No. 2 doubles – Javier Navarro/Collin Hendricks, Chelan, def. Levi Schell/Jesse Holan, Ton., 6-4, 5-7, 6-0. <strong> GRAND COULEE –</strong> The Liberty Bell High School boys tennis team swept Lake Roosevelt, 5-0, in a league match Friday. Carlos Perez won 6-1, 6-1, to lead the boys. Jesse Schulz won 6-0, 6-0. Stoney Hulon won 6-1, 6-1. Fletcher Rickabaugh and Daniel Sonnichsen won in doubles, 6-0, 6-1. D.J. Haley and Josh Frey won 8-6, 6-2. The girls lost 2-3. Tulie Budiselich won a single match, 6-3 and 6-0. Erin Frey and Logan Butler won 8-6 and 6-2. Liberty Bell is at Okanogan on Thursday. <strong>CHELAN –</strong> Chelan shut out Pateros, 5-0, in both boys and girls non-league matches Thursday. In a close boys No. 1 singles match, Chelan’s Tanner Hendricks defeated Jorge Caballero of Pateros 6-7 (4-7), 6-1 and 6-0. Chelan’s Vanessa Miller edged Julia Karkaainen of Pateros, 8-5. Pateros is at Liberty Bell on Thursday before returning home for Oroville and White Swan on Saturday.

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Liberty Bell boys take third in big meet

A half-dozen regional track teams competed at the Cashmere Invitational, which drew 22 teams including a third of the state’s 1A schools Saturday. Mansfield’s Macen McLean earned all 20 points for the Kernels (11th), winning the high jump (6-4) and the long jump (21-6). Liberty Bell’s boys finished third with 50.25 points behind Zillah at 87 points and King’s at 71.25 points. Mountain Lion boys winning included Liam Daily in the 800 (2:01.27) and Ben Klemmeck in the 1,500 (4:17.77). Austin Watson was second in the long jump (20-01) and fourth in the 100 (11.85). Klemmeck was fourth in the triple jump (38-3). Jaymis Hanson was sixth (19-00.75) in the long jump. The Liberty Bell 4x100 relay was third (45.69) with Cesar Dominguez, Hanson, Jose Dominguez and Watson. The 4x400 relay was third (3:41.14) with Kelsey Jensen, Hanson, Cesar Dominguez and Daily. Hanson tied for sixth in the high jump (5-10). Jensen was sixth in the 300 hurdles (44.50). Oroville’s Tanner Smith was third in the 100 (11.79). Okanogan’s Mason Guerrette was fourth in the long jump (19-5.5). Omak’s Marcos Ruiz was fifth (19-1.75) in the long jump and Sam Goble was seventh in the 3,000 (10:18.10). On the girls side, Tonasket produced 16 personal records, led by Cassie Spear finishing fourth in the 400 in one minute, 2.08 seconds. “That’s the eighth best in state 1A this season,” Tonasket coach Bob Thornton said. The Tigers’ Rose Walts finished second in the 100 hurdles (17.15) and fourth in the triple jump (33-1). Tonasket’s 4x100 relay was fourth (54.64) with Spear, Jaden Vugteveen, Walts and Bonnie Siegfried. Alissa Young was sixth (85-11) in the discus. Tonasket girls finished 11th with 25 points. “There were some great races” in Cashmere, Thornton said. Sierra Speiker pushed the Oroville girls to 12th by winning the 3,000 (10:17.24), taking third in the 1,500 (4:55.87) and fifth in the 800 (2:32.64). Okanogan (14th) was led by the 4x200 relay, which was fifth (1:55.09) with Emmy Engle, Alexis Jones, Keanna Egbert and Cayden Diefenbach. The Okanogan 4x400 relay was sixth (4:33.01) with Diefenbach, Egbert, Jones and Engle. Engle was fourth in the discus (92-4) and fourth in the javelin (112-06). Okanogan’s Cayden Diefenbach was sixth in the 400 (1:06.31). Teammate Keanna Egbert was seventh (104-05) in the javelin. Yvonne Kilgour finished second in the shot put (35-1.5) for Omak. Omak’s Haley Little tied for seventh in the high jump (4-8), seventh in the triple jump (31-7.5) and was eighth in the long jump (14-11.50). Diane Hilderbrand was seventh in the discus (84-03). Liberty Bell’s Sarina Williams was fifth in the javelin (111-10).

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


Cashmere chomps down on Omak softball

Cashmere swept Omak, 14-11 and 19-7, in a Caribou Trail League softball doubleheader Saturday. The Pioneers took a hit, literally, several times in the opener, but kept bouncing back. Omak’s Mariah Kruse took a line drive off a hand while playing third against a Cashmere slap hitter. A quick fix with ice and she was back on the field. Kruse then reached third on Omak’s next at-bat, only to have a teammate drive the ball hard down the third base line, hitting Kruse’s other hand. “Are you kidding me,” Kruse said while recovering with both arms pulled to her tight. “Kruse had a rough day,” Omak coach Rick Duck said. Cashmere led 8-2 after four innings before Omak scored nine runs in the final three innings to cut the margin. “I was happy with the way the girls battled back in this game,” said. “Cashmere had some timely hits and we had a couple of errors that cost us. We left a lot of runners on base.” Kara Keaton went 4-4 with a double to lead Omak. Omak (11) – Ken. Duck 1-3; Kruse 1-3; Keaton 4-4, 2B; Boyd 1-5. In the second game, Omak led 3-1 after the first inning before Cashmere struck for 8 runs in the next two innings and another 8 in the bottom of the sixth to end the game early. Madison Reed (1-2) and Nashoni Boyd (3-4) each doubled. Nooksack Valley (3-3) takes on Omak (3-5) in a non-league game at 10 a.m. Saturday in Chelan. Chelan (5-4) plays Nooksack Valley at noon in Chelan. Omak (7) – Ken. Duck 1-3; Zacherle 1-3; Kruse 1-4; Keaton 1-2, 2R; Boyd 3-4, 2B; Reed 1-2, 2B; Routien 1-2; Kod. Duck 1-1. uuuuu BREWSTER – Brewster remained undefeated in the Caribou Trail League by topping Quincy, 11-8 and 14-7, on Saturday. In the opener, Brewster led 5-1 after three innings behind the pitching of Markie Miller, who struck out 6, walked 9 and gave up 6 earned runs on 4 hits. Quincy committed 9 errors compared to 3 errors for Brewster, which finished with 10 hits. Miller (3-4) knocked out a double and drove in 4 runs. Vanessa Terrones was 2-4. In the second game, Brewster held a slim 5-3 lead after three innings before striking for nine runs in the next two innings. Miller struck out 7, walked 2 and gave up 2 earned runs on 7 hits. Terrones was 4-5 and Miller 3-5 with two home runs and 5 RBI. Cascade (2-5 overall, 0-3 league) plays a doubleheader at Brewster (4-4, 3-0) on Saturday. uuuuu CURLEW – A softball game slated for Columbia on Saturday will be rescheduled for May, Athletic Director Charlie Groth said. Northport is at Curlew on Saturday. uuuuu OKANOGAN – Okanogan shrugged off windy conditions and knocked off Cascade, 8-4 and 17-0, in a rescheduled game Friday. The game was moved up a day from Saturday due to the memorial service for Charity Rumbolz, a former softball player who died April 5. Okanogan jumped out to a 4-1 lead after three innings and finished with three runs in the bottom of the sixth. “We had a couple errors that gave them runs, but we didn’t let the mistakes snowball into big innings,” Okanogan coach Darin Radke said. Jill Townsend (3-4) and Makenzie Norwill (1-3) each blasted home runs. “It was nice to get wins against Cascade,” Radke said. “They have been the dominant force in the league for the past five or six years. For us to win was a big deal to our girls.” Norwill pitched seven innings, striking out 8, walking 2 and giving up 1 earned run on 5 hits. Okanogan (8) — Norwill 1-3, HR; Jill Townsend 3-4, HR; Peyton Oules 2-2, 2B; Amanda Erks 2-3. In the second game, Okanogan fired on offensive and defensive cylinders. The Bulldogs knocked out 19 hits while scoring five runs in the first, second and fifth innings to put the game away early. Norwill drilled her second home run on the day while Cameron Moses and Peyton Oules each knocked out dingers. Okanogan (6-2 overall, 3-0 league) plays a twin bill at Quincy (3-6, 0-3) on Saturday. Okanogan (17) — Brooklyn Bauer 3-4; Cameron Moses 3-4, 2B, HR; Norwill 4-4, 2 2B, HR; Townsend 3-4, 2B; Oules 3-3, 2B, HR; Erks 2-3, 2B. uuuuu TONASKET – Chelan pulverized Tonasket, 27-5 and 29-4, in a Caribou Trail League doubleheader Friday. Tonasket (1-8 overall, 0-3 league) is at Cashmere (5-3, 2-0) for a doubleheader Saturday. uuuuu CHELAN – Omak split with Chelan on Thursday, winning the opener 14-6 before falling 11-1 in the nightcap. The Pioneers drilled the Goats for 17 runs in the first game led by Makisha Zacherle and Nashoni Boyd, who each had two doubles. Rhaney Harris struck out 4, walked 2 and spread out 7 hits. “Harris threw her best game of the year,” Omak coach Rick Duck said. Omak (14) — Ken. Duck 2-5; Zacherle 4-4, 2 2B; Kruse 1-4; Keaton 1-5, 2B; N. Boyd 4-5; 2 2B; Jackson 1-4; Routien 2-5; Ables 1-3; Harris 1-3, 2B. Omak produced 5 errors and 2 hits in the second game. Kara Keaton walked two and gave up 6 earned runs on 11 hits. “Keaton threw well enough to win, just didn’t get the run support,” the coach said. “Still, it was a good day for our young team.” Omak (1) — N. Boyd 1-3; Kod. Duck 1-2. uuuuu WINTHROP – Liberty Bell stopped Tonasket, 19-6, in a non-league game Thursday. Bridgeport (5-2 overall, 0-2 league) is at Liberty Bell (6-1, 2-0) on Saturday. Tonasket (1-8, 0-3) is at Cashmere (5-3, 2-0) for a doubleheader Saturday.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


Tonasket soccer tops Chelan in shootout

<strong>TONASKET –</strong> Tonasket soccer shocked Chelan, 2-1, following a shootout Saturday in a Caribou Trail League matchup. “Both teams battled each other and the wind,” Chelan assistant coach Jim Broome said. Tonasket led 1-0 at the half on a goal by Elias Abrego on an assist by Isaiah Albright. “It was an excellent team effort,” Tonasket coach Jack Goyette said. “I am very proud of the team. This was our best team effort this year. We hope to sustain it.” Chelan’s Humberto Ramirez tied the game 30 seconds into the second half. The teams fought through two five-minute sudden-death overtimes before the shootout. The Goats finished with 31 shots on goal compared to 9 for the Tiger. “Tonasket’s goalkeeper had a great game stopping the Chelan attack,” Broome said. Tonasket (3-5 overall, 1-5 league) is at Cashmere (2-5, 1-4) on Friday. <strong>QUINCY</strong> – Quincy took over first place in the Caribou Trail League soccer standings with a 2-0 win over Brewster on Saturday. “It wasn’t one of our best games,” assistant coach David Garcia said. Both teams entered the game undefeated in the CTL. Brewster finished with 3 shots on goal (1 in the first half; 2 in the second half). Brewster’s Victor Chacon had 8 saves. Cascade (3-3-1) is at Brewster (6-1, 5-1) on Saturday. <strong>LEAVENWORTH –</strong> Justin Rivas scored three goals and Okanogan clamped down on third place in the Caribou Trail League with a 3-2 road victory over Cascade on Saturday. Okanogan assists were by Nathan Carter, Jason Perez and Fabian Rodriguez. “It was an evenly played game most of the way,” Okanogan coach Dean Klepec said. “We pulled ahead with about five minutes left and then held them off as they sent most of their team up the field.” Quincy (5-2 overall, 5-0 league) is at Okanogan (5-2, 4-2) on Saturday. <strong>NEWPORT –</strong> Newport edged Oroville, 5-4, in a shootout during a non-league match Saturday. Oroville’s Cristian Diaz scored on a penalty kick five minutes into the match. Aldo Perez and Abe Capote followed for a 3-0 Hornet lead at the half. The Grizzlies roared back in the second half, scoring four straight goals. Capote scored on a penalty kick, following Cristian Diaz being fouled, with a minute to go in regulation to tie the game. “Both teams decided to do a shootout,” Oroville coach Mike Pitts said. “Both teams took eight penalty kicks and in the end we lost 5-6. “I couldn’t be happier with how far we’ve come as a team and working out these kinks before league play is what’s it’s about.” Oroville (1-4-2 overall, 0-1 league) is at Liberty Bell (6-1, 1-0) on Thursday. <strong>OMAK –</strong> Cashmere blanked Omak, 10-0, in a Caribou Trail League soccer match Saturday. “They beat us to nearly every ball in the air,” Omak coach Chris Werner said. “The wind in the first half was big for them. We didn’t take advantage of that in the second half.” Omak (0-7 overall, 0-5 league) is at Chelan (3-4-1, 3-3) on Saturday. <strong>OMAK –</strong> Liberty Bell stopped Omak, 5-2, in a non-league soccer match Thursday. The Mountain Lions finished with 17 shots on goal, where the Pioneers’ goalkeeper had 12 saves, compared to 5 shots on goal for Omak. German Ramirez scored both of Omak’s goals, one on an assist by Helin Perez. Oroville (1-4-2 overall, 0-1 league) is at Liberty Bell (6-1, 1-0) on Thursday. <strong>LEAVENWORTH –</strong> Cascade edged Tonasket, 1-0, in a league soccer match Thursday. <strong> OROVILLE –</strong> Oroville and the Moses Lake C-squad fought to a 4-4 draw in a non-league match Thursday. Moses Lake scored first before Oroville responded with two goals by Abe Capote and a goal by Aldo Perez. Down 4-3, Oroville’s Cristian Diaz tied the match on an unassisted goal. “We haven’t had many tight games, so I was happy to see them fight it out,” Oroville coach Mike Pitts said. “We need games like this going into league play.”

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


April 16, 2014- Speedy Sports Story

M-1 Garand match planned for April 26 OKANOGAN — The Okanogan Wildlife Council is sponsoring an M-1 Garand Match April 26 at its Lower Rifle Range next to the landfill off of B&O Road. Registration starts at 8:15 a.m. A safety briefing follows at 8:45 a.m. and firing at 9 a.m. The match is open to shooters using M-1 Garands, M-1 Carbines, M-1A (M-14), AR-15s, ‘03 and ‘03-A3 Springfield, Model 1917 Enfield and 30-40 Craig Rifles, spokesman Ralph Malone said. The rifles must be in their military configuration and not “sporterized,” Malone said. The match is open to anyone, but requires that the Okanogan Wildlife Club have a notarized Civilian Marksmanship Program Eligibility Affidavit on file for each shooter. “If you have not fired in a Garand Match at the Okanogan Wildlife Council before, we will have the forms, and a notary available during the registration period,” Malone said. — The Chronicle

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


Chelan topples ’Dogs

Chelan golf teams won by default over Okanogan, which could not field complete boys or girls teams in the Caribou Trail League matchup Thursday. For Okanogan, Joey Staggs finished with a 102 to lead the boys. Ana Baum carded a 104 to lead the girls. Eli Christenson of Chelan took medalist honors for the boys with an 89. Elijah Larson was close with a 91. Chelan’s Casey Jackson was medalist for the girls with a 96. Omak and Okanogan were to face off Tuesday at Okanogan Valley Golf Club. Cascade is at Okanogan on April 21 and Quincy takes on the Bulldogs on April 24. Quincy is at Omak, played at the Okanogan Valley Golf Club, on April 21. State golf is May 28-29 at various sites around the state. Okanogan boys: Joey Staggs (56, 46) 102. Zach Mostad (66, 64) 130. Steven Roberts 96 on nine. Rowan Bauer 87 on nine. Okanogan girls: Ana Baum (52, 52) 102. Karina Baum (90, 84) 174. Raelee Woolschlager (97, 90) 187.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..
 

United Powwow set for May 3

American Indian drummers and dancers will gather May 3 for the 26th annual United Powwow at the Omak Tribal Longhouse on Mission Road east of town. The free event is open to the public. The theme is “Families Closing the GAP: Graduate, Attendance and Participate,” with support coming from the Colville Confederated Tribes K-12 Youth and Attendance Program. Students and families will be honored for attending school. A plaque dedication is planned in memory of Christine Quintasket, whose pen name was Mourning Dove. Quintasket, a Colville tribal member, was the first American Indian woman to publish a novel. A symposium celebrating her accomplishments was last fall in Omak-Okanogan. The powwow’s first grand entry will begin at 1 p.m., with dinner following at 5 p.m., and an evening grand entry at 7 p.m. Soy Redthunder will be the emcee and Dan Nanamkin will be the arena director. A United Powwow queen and princess will also be selected for the 2014-15 year. All drummers and dancers are welcome, and host drums will be chosen at each session. The drug- and alcohol-free event is supported by the Wenatchee Valley College at Omak Red Road Association and the Omak School District Salish language class.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


‘Willy Wonka Jr.’ is in May

The Merc Playhouse Children’s Musical Theater will present “Willy Wonka Jr.” on May 9-18 at the theater, 101 S. Glover St. The show is based on the book “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” by Roald Dahl. Curtain times are 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays. Admission will be charged. A “pay what you can” performance will be at 7 p.m. May 15. The cast features 33 Methow Valley children, costumes, lights and sound by Liberty Bell High students, and set pieces by the Liberty Bell High School construction, welding and art classes.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


April 16, 2014- Jail-Sheriff-Tribal Bookings

<strong>From Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office records</strong> April 14 Abby Rae Gardner, 35, fourth-degree assault-domestic violence. April 13 Marti Lynn Worrell, 34, possession of controlled substance-methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Brittany May Postel, 23, Benton County warrant for failure to appear for possession of methamphetamine. Julio Cesar Hernandez, 29, third-degree driving while license suspended and a Franklin County/Washington State Patrol warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended. Chelsea Marie Isoldi, 21, Douglas County warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended. April 12 Javier Valdovinos-Quintana, 20, Douglas County court commitment for second-degree criminal trespass. Jose Cardenas Vega, 50, fourth-degree assault-domestic violence. Raymond Wilbur Ward, 46, driving while under the influence. Joseph Edward McEthmar, 48, Omak warrants for failure to appear for driving while under the influence and failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended, third-degree driving while license suspended and violation of ignition interlock. Frankie Vincent Mora Jr., 33, East Wenatchee court commitment for disorderly conduct. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 30, residential burglary and violation of protection order. Aaron Michael Arnold, 28, East Wenatchee court commitment for violation of no-contact order. Cameron John Taylor, 19, violation of protection order. Tyler James Kion, 23, driving while under the influence. April 11 Jason Eugene Meusy, 33, Washington State Patrol warrant for failure to appear/comply for driving while under the influence, Stevens County warrant for failure to appear for driving while under the influence and a Spokane tribal warrant for failure to appear. John Christian Cattin, 28, Douglas County third-degree driving while license suspended, Douglas County ignition interlock violation and a Grant County warrant for failure to appear for driving while under the influence. Teroux Dennard Blackburn, 53, Douglas County driving while under the influence. Chloe M. Callander, 19, Douglas County court commitments for residential burglary and first-degree theft. Jose Manuel Ibarra-Chacon, 20, court commitment for possession of controlled substance/minor in possession. Eric Robert Foyle, 30, second-degree criminal trespass and third-degree theft. Hilario Martinez Marroquin, 48, Douglas County first-degree driving while license suspended, Douglas County ignition interlock violation and a Grant County warrant. April 10 Brian Keith Wilson, 36, Douglas County failure to appear for second-degree identification theft, Grant County warrant for failure to appear for second-degree possession of stolen property and third-degree theft. Cecelia Rita Condon, 41, two counts first-degree trafficking, second-degree burglary, second-degree vehicle prowl and five counts third-degree theft. Augustina L. Flores-Purser, 24, failure to appear for no valid operator’s license. Cedar Chantrelle St. Onge, 21, first-degree trafficking, third-degree theft. Esteban Delapaz-Carillo, 40, Douglas County warrant for failure to appear for possession of controlled substance-methamphetamine, U.S. Marshal’s hold, Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold and a Douglas County warrant for failure to comply for driving while under the influence. Dakotah Dupree Condon, 22, Superior Court warrant for failure to appear for second-degree burglary and Superior Court warrant for failure to appear for first-degree trafficking. Shannon Cersten Strader, 22, first-degree kidnapping, felony harassment. Malcom David Carson, 34, Omak warrant for failure to pay for third-degree theft, Department of Corrections detainer, Grant County warrant for failure to appear for driving while under the influence, Spokane County warrant for first-degree escape, tribal warrants for two counts possession of controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia and third-degree driving while license suspended. William Scott Sanders, 42, third-degree driving while suspended and a warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended. April 9 Mariah Kirstin Todd, 20, third-degree theft and first-degree trafficking stolen property. Crecencio Perez Jr., 39, warrant for failure to comply for fourth-degree assault-domestic violence. Donna Eileen Noel, 50, first-degree theft, second-degree theft, forgery and first-degree identity theft. Chase Allen Speegle, 19, Douglas County felony violation of no-contact order, Douglas County fourth-degree assault and two counts violation of no-contact order. Johnny Ray McKibben, 44, Douglas County warrant for third-degree theft. Michael Aaron Cornella, 24, Omak warrant for failure to appear for third-degree theft, Washington State Patrol warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended and an Okanogan County warrant for failure to appear for making false statement to a public servant. Edward Adam Mangold, 54, Douglas County warrant for third-degree driving while license suspended and Douglas County ignition interlock violations. Lynn Marie Arnhold, 37, theft of a motor vehicle. Jesus Denis Sandoval, 19, hit and run unattended-property damage and third-degree driving while license suspended. Robert Brian Bradshaw, 26, second-degree burglary, first-degree trafficking stolen property, second-degree vehicle prowl and four counts third-degree theft. Victor Manuel Rodriguez, 45, warrant for failure to appear for third-degree malicious mischief-domestic violence. April 8 Jonathan Gabriel Zigler, 21, two counts residential burglary, two counts second-degree burglary, second-degree theft and second-degree possession of stolen property. Cable Ryan Ritz, 30, Department of Corrections detainer. Charleta Anya Braziel, 37, Douglas County warrant for failure to appear for first-degree driving while license suspended. Andrea Michelle Dawes, 38, East Wenatchee warrant for failure to appear for first-degree driving while license suspended. Jerrod Ray Thomas, 29, Douglas County warrant for failure to comply for third-degree driving while suspended. Garrett James Smith, 28, Douglas County warrants for failure to appear for taking a motor vehicle without permission, failure to appear for hit and run, third-degree driving while license suspended/revoked, second-degree malicious mischief, two counts third-degree assault, first-degree criminal trespassing, Douglas County warrant for violation of no-contact order and fourth-degree assault-domestic violence. Eric Scott Naruszewicz, 41, hit and run unattended-property damage. Ernesto Eduardo Mendez-Leon, 19, bench warrant for failure to appear for possession of controlled substance. Aaron David Zigler, 25, three counts residential burglary, second-degree burglary, second-degree theft, second-degree possession of stolen property and second-degree malicious mischief. Caesar Arroyo, 28, obstructing, resisting arrest, warrant for failure to appear for third-degree theft, warrant for failure to appear for violation of harassment order, two warrants for failure to appear for driving while under the influence, warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended/revoked and a warrant for failure to appear for violation of ignition interlock. Matthew Dylan Hendricks, 20, Douglas County two counts forgery. Ruben Morales Ramirez, 31, Douglas County court commitment for first-degree driving while license suspended/revoked. Aaron Tyler Mack, 31, Coulee Dam warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended/revoked. Jared Patrick McLaughlin, 23, reckless driving, driving while under the influence and third-degree driving while license suspended/revoked. April 7 Francisco Gonzalez, 19, Washington State Patrol warrants for failure to appear for paraphernalia use and possession of under 40 grams of marijuana and possession of under 40 grams of marijuana, second-degree robbery, second-degree theft and second-degree malicious mischief. Barry J. Collins, 29, warrant for failure to appear for first-degree driving while license suspended, residential burglary, second-degree burglary, second-degree theft and second-degree malicious mischief. Ronald Eugene Moore, 33, warrant for first-degree murder, warrant for theft of a firearm, warrant for two counts second-degree assault and a warrant for unlawful possession of a firearm. Kevin Bert Priest, 48, first-degree driving while license suspended. Adam Dale Ellis, 47, Chelan County warrant for parole violation, Chelan County warrant for failure to appear for possession of alcohol in a park. Carl Allen Snyder, 49, driving while under the influence. Damon Shane Condon, 37, Grant County warrant for failure to appear for second-degree driving while license suspended. Roberta Joy Staggs, 40, warrant for failure to appear for third-degree driving while license suspended. <strong> From Colville Tribal</strong> Corrections records April 13 Kyle W. Desautel, 35, disobedience of a lawful court order and resisting arrest or process. April 12 Kendra R. Abrahamson, 23, tribal warrant for battery-domestic violence. Glenn F. Desautel, 43, tribal warrant for failure to pay child support and Okanogan County warrant for no valid operator’s license. April 11 Mylan Williams, 35, arson and attempted criminal homicide. April 10 Karen L. Timentwa, 47, court commitment for physical control and driving while suspended/revoked. David E. Matt, 36, battery-domestic violence. <strong>From Okanogan County Superior Court records</strong> Easement complaint filed Lonnie and Molly Dixon filed Feb. 18 a complaint for prescriptive easement or in the alternative for a private way of necessity; and for injunctive relief against Teri G. Mitschelen. Superior Court Judge Hank Rawson recused himself from the case Feb. 20. <strong> From Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office complaints</strong> April 13 Vehicle theft on South Fourth Avenue, Okanogan. Assault on Monse Bridge Road, Brewster. April 12 Assault on Engh Road, Omak. Theft on Ninemile Road, Oroville. Malicious mischief on South Fourth Avenue, Okanogan. Vehicle theft on Max Goehry Road, Brewster. Theft on Plata Road, Brewster. Theft on state Highway 20, Tonasket. Pipe taken. Unattended death on Barnholt Loop Road, Okanogan. April 11 Malicious mischief on Early Sunrise Drive, Tonasket. Lock cut on storage unit. Vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 97, Pateros. Burglary on Old Highway 97, Brewster. Fire on county Highway 7, Tonasket. Barn burned. April 10 Theft on Wolf Creek Road, Winthrop. Laptop, ax, tools and prescription medication taken from a vehicle. Theft on Beach Street, Pateros. Vehicle crash on South First Avenue, Okanogan. Vehicle crash on Jack Wells Road, Bridgeport. April 9 Assault on Coole Water Way, Tonasket. Burglary on U.S. Highway 97, Okanogan. Fraud on South Orchard Loop, Tonasket. Assault on state Highway 20, Winthrop. Vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 97, near Wells Dam. Patrol vehicle rear-ended. Fire on Robinson Canyon Road, Omak. Assault on Copple Road, Omak. Vehicle crash on East Seventh Street, Tonasket. Basketball hoop and mailbox hit. Burglary on Pine Street, Okanogan. April 8 Assault on North Second Avenue, Okanogan. Burglary on B&O North Road, Okanogan. Tools taken. Theft on Omak River Road, Omak. Theft on North Independence Street, Pateros. Basketball hoop taken. Theft on Morris Road, Okanogan. Vanity and mirror taken. Burglary on Sagebrush Trail, Omak. Burglary on Twisp-Winthrop Eastside Road, Winthrop. Fraud on South Fifth Avenue, Okanogan. April 7 Theft on Sunset Drive, Brewster. Metal taken. Theft on Thurlow Road, Twisp. Trail camera taken. Burglary on Aeneas Valley Road, Tonasket. Cabin entered. Malicious mischief on U.S. Highway 97; location not given. Vehicle window broken. Vehicle crash on Old Riverside Highway, Omak. Medical call on Fifth Avenue, Okanogan. Illegal burning on Erickson Drive, Brewster. Vehicle crash on Valley Road, Brewster.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


April 9, 2014- Criminal Cases

<strong>From Okanogan County Superior Court records</strong> Gomez case dismissed The court dismissed with prejudice April 7 the state’s case against Walter Gonzalez Gomez, 31, of Brewster. Bail was exonerated. Anderson sentenced Shawna Rae Anderson, 41, of Omak, pleaded guilty April 7 to attempted endangerment with a controlled substance. Anderson, who committed the crime Aug. 2, 2013, was sentenced to four-and-a-half months. A second identical charge was dismissed. Gonzales pleads guilty Francisco Gonzales, 19, of Omak, pleaded guilty April 7 to second-degree robbery, second-degree theft and second-degree malicious mischief. Gonzales, who committed the crimes Nov. 3, 2012, was sentenced to 15 months. Gonzales was to pay restitution jointly and severally with Nicholas Renteria of $1,232.84 to Chris Allen, Okanogan, and $120 to Alicia Ramirez, Brewster. Weinthal sentenced Mark Jeffrey Weinthal, 49, of Lynnwood, pleaded guilty April 7 to possession of a controlled substance and possession of 40 grams or less of marijuana. Dismissed was use of drug paraphernalia. Weinthal, who committed the crimes Sept. 23, 2012, was sentenced to 30 days that could be served in Snohomish County. Buckmiller case dismissed The court dismissed without prejudice April 7 the state’s case against Chad Buckmiller of Oroville. Zamora sentenced Jorge Emilio Loza Zamora, 19, of Malott, pleaded guilty April 8 to possession of a controlled substance and minor possessing or consuming alcohol. Zamora, who committed the crimes March 23, was sentenced to 16 days. Carden sentenced Michelle Lynn Carden, 26, pleaded guilty April 8 to possession of a controlled substance, unlawful possession of a legend drug and use of drug paraphernalia. Carden, who committed the crimes Jan. 30, was sentenced to four months. Vehicle theft admitted Chehalis Cloud pleaded guilty April 8 to theft of a motor vehicle, which occurred between April 13 and 16, 2013, and two counts of second-degree theft, which occurred April 13, 2013. Cloud was sentenced to 60 days. Villegas pleads guilty Luis Gallegos Villegas, 29, pleaded guilty April 8 to second-degree possession of stolen property, first-degree attempted trafficking in stolen property and violation of a no contact, protection or restraining order. Villegas, who committed the crimes Jan. 26, was sentenced to 14.25 months. Valdovinos sentenced Lamberto Hernandez Valdovinos, 24, pleaded guilty April 8 to attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle, second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and possession of a controlled substance. Valdovinos, who committed the crimes June 18, 2013, was sentenced to 12.75 months. Smith charged Shaylin Jerran Smith, 20, of Nespelem, was charged March 31 with second-degree burglary, which allegedly occurred May 26, 2013. Vehicle theft alleged Destiny Delores Dill, 42, of Brewster, was charged April 3 with second-degree taking a motor vehicle without permission, which allegedly occurred March 29. Mitchell charged Nathan Andrew Mitchell, 25, of Oroville, was charged April 2 with harassment-threats to kill, which allegedly occurred March 31. Theft alleged Lucas Duayne Cook, 29, of Omak, was charged April 7 with taking a motor vehicle without permission, which allegedly occurred March 28. Austin charged Harvey Leroy Austin 54, was charged April 9 with possession of a controlled substance-hashish and second-degree vehicle prowling, which allegedly occurred April 6.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


April 16, 2014- Crashes

<strong>From Washington State Patrol reports</strong> <strong>Vehicle hits tree</strong> DISAUTEL — An Omak man was taken to Mid-Valley Hospital on Thursday after his car went off state Highway 155 and hit a tree a mile north of Disautel Pass. Charles William Edwards, 59, was taken to the hospital as a precaution, the Washington State Patrol said. His crash was attributed to a medical problem; he was not injured in the crash. Edwards was southbound at 9:17 p.m. when his car went off the road to the right and hit the tree. It came to rest 30 feet off the highway. No drugs or alcohol were involved, the patrol reported. Edwards was wearing a seatbelt, but his car was damaged. No charges are anticipated, the patrol said. <strong>Pedestrian struck</strong> REPUBLIC — A local man was injured Friday when he was struck by a vehicle on state Highway 20 three miles east of town. Brandon J. Smith, 30, ran from north to south across the highway and into the path of a car driven by Penelope R. Ripple, 55, Republic. The Washington State Patrol said Smith was intoxicated and intentionally ran across the road at 7:40 p.m. Smith was taken to Ferry County Memorial Hospital in Republic and then airlifted to the Tri-Cities. Drugs or alcohol were a factor in the crash, the patrol said. Ripple’s car was damaged, but driven from the scene. The crash is under investigation.

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Paving project begins

The state’s project to repave the main road through Okanogan and Omak gets under way tomorrow. State Highway 215 will be repaved from the south Okanogan city limits to its intersection with U.S. Highway 97 at the north end of Omak. The route is known as Second Avenue and Elmway in Okanogan and Okoma Drive, West Fourth Avenue, Main Street and Riverside Drive in Omak. An open house, to answer questions about the work, is planned for 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday at the state Department of Transportation office, 28862 U.S. Highway 97. “With an average daily traffic count of 13,000 vehicles in this corridor, the project will affect both communities from now through Labor Day,” project engineer Kevin Waligorski said. “While we’ve tried to reduce the inconvenience as much as possible, we want people to know what’s being done and when, so they can plan for it.” “For April, May and most of June, there will be no actual road work” as Granite Northwest Inc. crews do preliminary work on 130 sidewalk sites to bring them up to Americans with Disabilities Act standards and install “bulb-out” crossings in Omak and Okanogan, department spokesman Jeff Adamson said. Earlier this year, Omak City Council authorized bulb-outs at three intersections along Main Street, City Administrator Ralph Malone said. A bulb-out is an extension of the sidewalk that puts pedestrians closer to the traveling lane so motorists can see them better. That can make it easier for someone to cross a street. The city received a Department of Transportation grant to pay for bulb-outs at Apple, Bartlett and First avenues and additional lighting. Grant and match money will be turned over to the state and rolled into the paving project contract, Malone said. The project is expected to cost about $430,000, including the city’s $40,000 match. Okanogan also plans additional bulb-outs at Second Avenue and Pine Street. The city already has bulb-outs at Queen and Rose streets. The city received a $99,000 Transportation Improvement Board grant for the project, including improvements to Pine Street between First and Third avenues. It also will be piggybacked onto the state project, Public Works Director Shawn Davisson said. Granite Northwest Inc., 249 Rodeo Trail Road, will be paid more than $3.18 million to remove the existing pavement, install new asphalt, upgrade signs and striping, and bring sidewalk ramps up to ADA standards. Adamson said standards for ramp inclines have changed, so existing ramps have to be replaced. Crosswalk signal buttons also have to be replaced to meet the standards, and the pedestrian island at the intersection of Riverside Drive and U.S. Highway 97 will be replaced. “Decorative pavers to match existing commercial themes also are included” in the ramp and bulb-out work, Adamson said. “During the first two months, the biggest impact will be on pedestrians as they are detoured around the sidewalk demolition and reconstruction.” Both cities have been doing utility work in advance of the state project, so as not to dig up the new pavement. Buno Construction worked all winter on Omak’s sewer line replacement project along the route before the state project begins. Okanogan is replacing 11 manholes on Second Avenue between Norman and Harley streets. That project is under way. KRCI, Wenatchee, is doing the work on a $166,252.84 contract. Adamson said actual paving is expected in July and August, with crews working at night. The pavement will be ground off and then replaced. He said noise shouldn’t be a factor, since the asphalt has deteriorated enough that it’s soft and will grind off easily. Motorists can expect two-way traffic with lane shifts through the three-lane sections of the road and 20-minute delays with flaggers when crews are working in two-lane sections. The project also includes a small portion of state Highway 155 east of Main Street in Omak. Work will be suspended Aug. 7-10 during the Omak Stampede.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


Could standoff happen here?

A lot of area cattlemen are talking about last week’s Nevada stand-off between rancher Cliven Bundy and the federal Bureau of Land Management over access to decades-old grazing lands and related fees. In the wake of the federal agency’s decision to back down, local cattlemen are asking could the same thing happen here.

April 16, 2014 midnight read more..


Galloping good time

Quincy Downey and Bryson Butterfly each earned a saddle for being the all-around winners in peewee/junior divisions at the annual Tonasket Junior Rodeo last weekend. Kaelyn Marchand and Wade Bruemmer won saddles for being winners in intermediate/senior divisions. Chase Nigg was the lone senior boy to ride a bull, scoring a 72. Brent Griffin scored a 62 in bareback for senior boys. In senior girls, Bailey Nachigal scored a 72 for first and Kaelyn Marchand a 63 for second in cow riding. Quincy Downey hung on for a 69 to claim first in peewee girls calf riding. Jadya Taylor scored a 63 and Sage Olmstead a 35. Braeden Signor-McLaughlin scored a 63 to win peewee boys calf-riding. Age group all-around winners are: <strong>Girls</strong> Little People – Rocksie Timentwa, 24 points, first in California stake race, barrel racing and pole bending; second dummy roping; third goat tail untying; fourth mutton busting. 2, Lucchese Ford, 16 points. 3, JayCee Goodwin, 14. Peewee – Quincy Downey, 21 points, first calf riding, goat flanking and barrel racing; second pole bending, California stake race and dummy roping. 2, Sage Olmstead, 18 points. Junior – Karlie Jo Richey, 12 points, first in goat tying and breakaway roping; second in steer daubing; fourth in barrel racing. 2, Abbi Popelier, 7 points. Intermediate – Krista Marchand, 11 points, first in goat tying and breakaway roping; second in steer daubing. 2, Makenly Davis, 10 points. Senior – Kaelyn Marchand, 13 points, first in boat tying and steer daubing; second in cow riding; third in pole bending. 2, Bailey Nachigal, 10 points. 3, Haley Wainright, 8 points. <strong>Boys</strong> Peewee – Bryson Butterfly, 18 points, first in pole bending, California stake race and dummy roping; second in goat flanking and barrel racing. 2, Brier Selvidge, 15 points. 3, Braeden Signor-McLaughlin, 12 points. 4, Diesel Downey, 8 points. Junior – Clay Buchert, 13 points, first in barrel racing and steer daubing; second in pole bending; third in goat tying. 2, Brayden Schmidt, 10 points. 3, Tyler Popelier, 9 points. Intermediate – Wade Bruemmer, 15 points, first in calf stake tying, breakaway roping and steer daubing; second in chute dogging. 2, Dylan Beck, 10 points. Senior – Chance Stucker, 11 points, first in calf roping and steer wrestling; second in chute dogging.

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April 16, 2014- Letters to the Editor

<strong>Let transgender experts do their job</strong> I think we can say one idiomatic definition of an idiot is someone who makes decisions about something without first acquiring knowledge. If judges on the benches of our courts acted in such a manner, the country would devolve into chaos.

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Tuesday, April 15

    

Monday, April 14



Sunday, April 13

 

’Dogs, Bears win

Okanogan came from behind to top Tonasket, 4-1, in a Caribou Trail League soccer match Tuesday. “In the first half with the wind, we struggled with getting scoring opportunities,” Okanogan coach Dean Klepec said. “In the second half against the wind, we did a much better job of controlling the ball and making good passes to set up scoring opportunities.” Tonasket got on the board first. The scorer was not reported. Okanogan’s Fabian Rodriguez scored unassisted to tie the game.

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Chelan tops Pioneers

The Chelan boys knocked off Omak, 378-403, in a Caribou Trail League golf match Tuesday at Okanogan Valley Golf Club.

April 13, 2014 midnight read more..


Day of Silence quiets school

Omak High School’s first-ever Day of Silence in support of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students went off Friday without any problems.

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May 13, 2014- News Briefs

<strong>Winthrop plans marijuana store hearing</strong> WINTHROP – The Town Council will host a public hearing at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Barn, 51 state Highway 20, for an appeal by Austin Lott on whether a recreational marijuana retail store can be located in an industrial zone. Lott’s application for a state business license at 29 Horizon Flats Road STE 7 is pending.

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April 13, 2014- Sheriff/Police Office reports

<strong>From Douglas County Sheriff’s Office reports</strong> April 11 Hazard on 11th Street near the school, Bridgeport. April 10 Malicious mischief on Whitehall Road, Coulee City. April 9 Theft in Coulee Dam; location not given. April 8 Domestic disturbance at 400 Fairview Ave., Bridgeport. April 6 Animal problem at 26 McCormack St., Bridgeport Bar. April 5 Malicious mischief at 108 Arden St., Bridgeport Bar.

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Garden blooms love of learning

Local students are spending their afternoons learning about Pateros School District’s fledgling garden, which could be finished by the end of the day Monday.

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Some fish missed

I just completed writing this year’s Fishrapper, the annual fishing prospect magazine that will appear in The Chronicle’s Wednesday edition.

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In search of ‘Dead Horse Cliff’

X marks the spot. Armed with a small topographical map and global-positioning devices, three history buffs and a journalist headed into the hills above Riverside on Thursday in search of the kill site from which Dead Horse Canyon gets its name.

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Crews poised for wildfire season

Fire Chief Kevin Bowling said it’s still too early to tell what this year’s fire season will bring. “Omak fire has responded to nine brush fires this spring,” he said, noting that’s “a little above average.”

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Saturday, April 12



Friday, April 11



Thursday, April 10

  

Wednesday, April 9

     

April 9, 2014- Letters to the Editor

<strong>Resist transgender rules compliance</strong> Under the guise of preventing “discrimination” against those who choose to participate in behavior contrary to the laws of God, nature and even common

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April 9, 2014- Business Briefs

Special election ballots are in the mail OKANOGAN – Ballots for the April 22 special election are in the mail. Voters who haven’t received their ballot by Friday are asked to call their county’s

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Pot lottery set for April 21-25

The state Liquor Control Board has set the week of April 21-25 for the lottery to select recreational marijuana retail applicants who may receive business licenses.

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Omak Fire Department turns 100

The Fire Department will celebrate its centennial with an open house April 19. The event runs from noon to 4 p.m. at the fire hall, 16 N. Ash St. Visitors will be able to meet firefighters and see equipment, Chief Kevin Bowling said.

April 9, 2014 midnight read more..
 

Gov. Inslee should've signed drone law

Voters deserve a governor who will protect their constitutionally guaranteed right to privacy. And they deserve the ability to restrict the use of drones over their property.

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April 9, 2014- Community Briefs

Green Okanogan sets e-cycling event TONASKET – Green Okanogan plans a low-key recycling information and e-waste disposal event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 19.

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Reduced to hitchhikers

When President Obama permanently grounded America’s space shuttles a couple of years ago, he made a huge mistake. He gave Russia carte blanche over the International Space Station and we now pay $70 million each for our astronauts to hitch a ride.

April 9, 2014 midnight read more..


State road work begins in earnest

Work is getting under way in earnest this week on several state highways in and around Okanogan County as part of a $15.5 million state project to resurface 238 miles of 10 state highways in five counties. The state is chip sealing state Highways 17, 20, 155, 172 and 174, and U.S. Highways

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April 9, 2014- Criminal Cases

<strong>From Okanogan County Superior Court records</strong> Jury verdict rendered Aaron J.C. Pfaltzgraff-Miller, 20, of Omak, was found guilty April 2 of second-degree assault. Pfaltzgraff-Miller, who committed the crime Aug. 6, 2013, was sentenced April 3 to 20 months. Oliver sentenced

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Hospital leaders to meet

A committee comprising local health care representatives may finally meet for the first time this month, but at least one hospital official is still skeptical of the main topic, consolidating the three hospital districts.

April 9, 2014 midnight read more..


Snow water content low

Snow courses in Okanogan County generally show lower-than-average water content, with one at 18 percent of the 30-year average while another was at 183 percent of the short-term average.

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Speedy sports stories

Brian Condon takes top golf honor OKANOGAN — Brian Condon took top honors with an even-par 71 during the 2014 Men’s Opening Day Tournament on Sunday at the Okanogan Valley Golf Club. Mike Bordner was second at 72 and Brian Lewis was third at 77 in the tournament that drew 32 players to“maybe the prettiest day of the season,” club professional Bill Sproule said. In the net division, Gary Klepec was first with a net 68, one stroke over Jay VanderWeide with a net of 69. Bill Neely and Mike Cornett

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Basketball FRENZY!

This year’s Basketball Frenzy fizzled at the end for all but the mother-and-son entry of Joy Fraley and Reilly Davis of Omak.

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Trio wins bowling

Jayna Hubbard, Panda Dunckel and Lynn Hoover finished first (25 points, 4,339 pins) in a Swiss Trio bowling tournament Sunday at Valley Lanes.

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Dam removal is topic

Fisheries scientist and manager Dennis Dauble will speak about the ecology of dam removal in the Pacific Northwest.

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April 9, 2014- Arts/Entertainment Briefs

<strong>New Fiber Fest celebrates yarns</strong> <em>OKANOGAN —</em> A celebration of local yarns and the people who produce and work with them is planned May 17 at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds, 175 Rodeo Trail Road. The free Okanogan Fiber Fest runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Bring your lawn chair and join a knitting or spinning circle, learn new fiber skills at a workshop, shop the local fiber products offered at the vendor area and enjoy local music,” organizers with the Okanogan Valley Fiber Association said.

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April 9, 2014- Civil Matters

<strong>From Okanogan County Superior Court records</strong> Dissolution granted Kaarin E. Kelly and Steven J. Kelly, with wife’s name changed to Kaarin E. Starr.

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April 9, 2014- Jail-Sheriff-Tribal Bookings

<strong>From Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office records</strong> April 6 David Lee Fitzgerald, 58, driving while under the influence. Stormy Renee Picard, 39, driving while under the influence, third-degree driving while license suspended/revoked.

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Talks begin in CEO hiring

Three Rivers Hospital has begun contract negotiations with J. Scott Graham to potentially take over as CEO this month.

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Canadians worry about mussels

Thinking about boating on the Canadian side of Lake Osoyoos or in other British Columbian waters? Better inspect your vessel for zebra and quagga mussels.

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Tuesday, April 8



Sunday, April 6

 

Youngsters explore art

Children from Oroville, Tonasket, Riverside and Okanogan spent part of last week’s vacation exploring art during the Apple Hill Art Camps spring break workshop.

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Brewster jumps into first

Cristian Talavera required only a minute to snatch victory from defeat in a 2-1 Brewster win over Chelan in a Caribou Trail League soccer match Tuesday.

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Brewster knocks off No. 1 Meridian

BELLINGHAM – No. 2 state-ranked Brewster used some heavy hitting to turn back No. 1 Meridian, 5-4, in eight innings of a non-league baseball game Wednesday.

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Rare banner earned

Oroville will display the school’s first-ever state banner for girls basketball in the gymnasium. “Oroville has never been to state, until this year, depending on what WIAA ends up considering, if the Top 16 is state or not,” Oroville coach Mike Bourn said. “I guess they are going to. That’s what they said at the start of the year.”

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Highway on track for mid-May opening

At the end of the first week clearing snow from the North Cascades Highway and more snow forecast for this weekend, the state is still on track to reopen the road in mid-May.

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New law requires online agendas

A bill requiring most public agencies to post their meeting agendas online a day before their meetings has been signed into law and is drawing mixed reactions locally.

April 6, 2014 midnight read more..


City gets new fishing access

The city will soon have another fishing access area with a nearby campsite and walking trails along the banks of the Columbia River.

April 6, 2014 midnight read more..


Review of purchases gets going

A public review will open in the next few months on Round 1 of the Colville Confederated Tribes’ land management plans and site-specific projects for the following list of properties purchased by Bonneville Power Administration:

April 6, 2014 midnight read more..


BPA biologist gets earful on land buys

A Bonneville Power Administration biologist got an earful Tuesday from Okanogan County commissioners and several residents about the agency’s land purchases for fish habitat restoration.

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Wednesday, April 2

  

Transgender policies on docket

The Omak School Board will consider an anti-discrimination policy and procedures dealing with transgender students when it meets at 10 a.m. today in the district office, 619 W. Bartlett Ave.

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Board backs CEO choice

Three Rivers Hospital commissioners are standing behind their selection of embattled Coulee Medical Center Administrator J. Scott Graham as their new CEO.

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Boards due for change

The Okanogan County Parks and Recreation Board will soon be repurposed to serve the entire county, and a new board in charge of overseeing the county fair will be created.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Commission seeks new lease

The state Parks and Recreation Commission decided last week that it will seek a new 25-year lease to continue operating Bridgeport State Park.

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Want a job? Attend trade schools

Millions of unemployed college graduates are back where they started, living with their parents. Upon receiving their diplomas, they find themselves saddled with crushing student loan debt and unable to find a job. More than 36 percent of those who have found jobs aren’t working in their chosen profession — many are working for minimum wage.

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We need a fair tax code

As tax day nears on April 15, we’re reminded of the tremendous impact decisions made in Washington, D.C., have here on families, farmers, and businesses.

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Orozco joins City Council

The City Council is complete once again with the appointment of a new fifth member last week. Sergio Orozco was selected and sworn in during the March 26 meeting, Finance Director Karen Brown said.

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Teams roar back for wins

Brewster’s Raul Olivera picked up the pitching victory after walking home the winning run, 7-6, in a non-league baseball game against Friday Harbor on Saturday.

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Okanogan splits at Eastmont

Okanogan softball split with Eastmont, taking the opener 16-4 and falling in the nightcap 7-1. “It was fun to see the girls come out and really compete against a 4A school, who is one of the favorites to win the Big 9,” Okanogan coach Darin Radke said. “They had the returning Big 9 MVP in the circle in game one.”

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Team travels through snow

Neither rain, sleet nor hail could keep Tonasket High School’s track team from reaching the Colville Invitational on Saturday.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Omak golfers top Raiders

Omak High School opened its golf season on a winning note, topping Lake Roosevelt, 185-247, Thursday at the Okanogan Valley Golf Club.

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Murder trial delayed; next hearing is April 14

The trial for a father and son accused of first-degree murder has been postponed. John Wayne Jennings, 57, and his son, Adam Shaun Jennings, 27, were scheduled to go to trial Thursday in Okanogan County Superior Court for the Sept. 2, 2013, death of Hoquiam resident Michael Ray Carrigan, 52.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Teens knock out top country hits

Drew Jaeger relied on songs made popular by The Platters and Vince Gill en route to claiming his second straight Washington State Nashville Country Star title Saturday.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Bracket-busters leave Davis first, Larson second

The second week of March Madness probably caused a few prognosticators to pull out their hair. After the last buzzer, the last intentional foul and final NCAA image of glad and sad, the contest saw 54 percent of the entries come to an end.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Slide claims local woman’s mother

OSO – A Bridgeport Elementary School teacher lost her mother and her childhood home in the recent landslide that has so far claimed 27 lives and caused dozens more to go missing. Linda McPherson, mother of teacher and Bridgeport Planning Commission member Kate McPherson, died in the March 22 landslide.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Twisp man charged in chase

A Twisp man was charged last Wednesday in Okanogan County Superior Court after leading sheriff’s deputies on a March 23 chase over Loup Loup Pass.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


April 2, 2014- Sheriff/Police Office reports

<strong>From Okanogan County Superior Court records</strong> Martinez dismissal The court dismissed without prejudice March 24 the state’s case against Juan Aparicio Martinez, 21, of Brewster.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..


Search for Three Rivers CEO should restart

To clear the air, we encourage Three Rivers commissioners to start the process over. The board should hire an outside professional consultant to find qualified candidates, perform professional background checks and open the process up for public scrutiny.

April 2, 2014 midnight read more..

Tuesday, April 1