Exploring the Okanogan

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Color plays a major role in our lives

During winter we get hungry for color; flowers are most welcome

Have you ever noticed what a role color plays in our lives?

Pilfered peach pie packs a punch

Story illustrates there’s more than meets the eye

There is a story that came out of the Civil War – a not-young woman had attached herself to an infantry unit.

Humans interfere with nature’s balance

Consider pythons and poinsettias

One of the things about the balance of nature is that we have interfered with it so much that in places it isn’t there any more.

Why is earthly phenomena different?

The other day, a friend asked, in all earnestness, why it is that some parts of the nation have one kind of weather or earthly phenomena and other parts have different ones. Why, for instance, does one section of the country get earthquakes and another have to contend with tornados? Each can be shattering.

Truth rises through geologic research

During the latter part of the 19th century, a considerable brouhaha was going on in Europe, and perhaps the U.S., as well.

Audience ecstatic over ‘Wiazard of Oz’

All the work to put on musical was well worth it

An ecstatic audience left the opening night performance of “The Wizard of Oz” on Friday at the Omak Performing Art Center.

Life is full of those ‘almost’ moments

Have you ever had cold chills over something unpleasant that nearly happened but didn’t quite? I call it having an “almost.” This one happened some 50 or 60 years ago. I was working in a school of music in downtown Chicago, commuting from home, some 20 miles from home to work. One of the students invited me to her home for dinner. I went home, and got ready. My mother and I agreed that since it was a dinner invitation, it would be inappropriate for me to eat before going to the dinner. I caught the interurban, went to the proper stop, walked the few blocks to her house and knocked. She came to the door and exclaimed, “Elizabeth, you’re on time! Come in.” A little surprised at such a greeting, I did. Other people began to arrive, and presently there was a congenial group. But no sign of food. The evening wore on, and presently I realized that it was almost time for the last train. Making my excuses to the hostess, I left to walk to the train stop. For a time I had the feeling I was being followed. Arrival at the train stop ended that. I reached the station platform to see the light of my train just approaching that stop. With a gasp of relief, I got on. My mother gave me something to eat. I never got an explanation for the dinner that wasn’t, and the student and I have not kept in touch. I do not even know if she is still alive. Now, we jump many decades and half a continent to Okanogan County. Here people do not invite others to dinner and then forget it. They feed them when they have not been invited. There are people who, if you drop in for a visit, won’t let you go until they have offered refreshments. It’s sort of like having to eat your way out. And since there are wonderful cooks hereabout, this is a great pleasure. I think they would be horrified at not giving a guest something to eat after a visit. And it’s delicious. As I said, they are fine cooks. It’s one of the tenets of the code of hospitality out here, and there are no frightening almosts, of the kind here described, in visiting friends here. Elizabeth Widel is a columnist for The Chronicle. This is the 2,885th column in a series. She may be reached at 509-826-1110.

Dollar has its roots in German valley

What is it that makes you think of something decades after you have not done so? Back in the hot metal days when The Chronicle was located on North Main Street, they gave me an article to set it in type. It was about the dollar.

Erosion not only reason for mountains

Continents slide on moving plates

We have considered erosion a number of times as a means of producing mountains. There also are other considerations.

Human-animal interactions intriguing

Pet stories tell connection tales

We have considered the topic of human-animal relations, but the subject is not exhausted. It may never be.

Reflecting on the North Cascades Highway

Longtime resident remembers first days of the route

There is something exciting about seeing something being built. Take, for example, the North Cascades Highway.

Spring brings recollection of flood years

During our period of joys and concerns in church on a recent Sunday, a young boy rejoiced: “The robins are back!”

‘Cascadia’ easily outlines local features

Book on local geology is a ‘delightful’ read

It was in 1972 that Bates McKee published his “Cascadia.” Not long after that, Bruce Wilson worked out of it in establishing the Okanogan County Historical Society Museum in Okanogan.

New technology erodes and rebuilds

More and more things done by machine today

We have considered erosion and its pervasive influence a long time. But there are short-time influences, too.

‘September Song’ prompted responses

Column gave us a peek into world of music

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about “September Song.” There have been two responses. They are from Mary Koch, writing from Holden Village up Lake Chelan, and from Dee Camp, here at The Chronicle.

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